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‘Concern’ in the Wrong Quarter

Summary:
Clearly, pedestrians and bicyclists are unsafe and must be banned – or least, fatwa’d. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration – an apparat of the federal government that by some ineffable self-accretion acquired legislative power over all of us without having been elected by any of us – is “concerned” about an increase in the number of pedestrian and cyclist deaths, 3.4 and 6.3 percent respectively. This is said to be the biggest increase in 30 years – which timeframe interestingly jibes almost exactly with the manifold increase in government mandated ssssaaaaaaafety equipment in new cars. Three decades ago – back in 1989 – no cars had any form of driver “assistance” or even back-up cameras. Yet people were backed

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Clearly, pedestrians and bicyclists are unsafe and must be banned – or least, fatwa’d.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration – an apparat of the federal government that by some ineffable self-accretion acquired legislative power over all of us without having been elected by any of us – is “concerned” about an increase in the number of pedestrian and cyclist deaths, 3.4 and 6.3 percent respectively.

This is said to be the biggest increase in 30 years – which timeframe interestingly jibes almost exactly with the manifold increase in government mandated ssssaaaaaaafety equipment in new cars.

Three decades ago – back in 1989 – no cars had any form of driver “assistance” or even back-up cameras. Yet people were backed into – and run over – less often back then. Could it possibly be because thirty years ago drivers were expected to not back into people or run them over – as opposed to relying on technology to prevent it?

Despite all the technology in new cars, they’re objectively less safe . . . to people who aren’t inside them – because of the gadget-addled people inside them.

“Safety” has been redefined to mean crashworthy.

The car protects the people in it from the forces of an impact. But they’re more apt to impact because of all the sssssaaaaafety inside them. Because they’re paying less attention.

And because they are less and less competent.

For about thirty years now, there has been a complete shift in emphasis away from minimal expectations of drivers in favor of almost total reliance on the car to take over the driving. Which might be the ticket – from the standpoint of avoiding the backing into and running over of people – if the technology weren’t just as fallible as the people who designed it.

Aye, there’s the rub.

People have come to believe that technology will solve our problems because they believe it is smarter than we are. But we design technology – and thus it is born with imperfections, as we are.

But the imperfections are different – and generalized.

One can predict – and take steps to deal with – a glaucomic human, one whose vision is fading and thus someone who should no longer be driving. There are tests for this and many people self-screen for this. They (being thinking creatures, unlike a computer) realize  they’re no longer safe to drive  – and stop driving on their own.

Eric Peters
Eric Peters is a freelance car/bike/political columnist. He escaped the corporate-owned media Big Boys years ago. Without the censorship of the corporate tools

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