Monday , September 23 2019
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Classic Cars and Classic Drivers

Summary:
Are old cars for old people? It seems to be so – if you go by what one typically sees at an old car show. The owners are mostly at least as old as their cars – and most of them are more than 40 years old, which is roughly the line of demarcation between modern cars – those with computers – and those without them, which were last made in the very early ‘80s.  The owners of pre-computer (and now classic) cars are now “classics” themselves. They are into classic cars because they grew up with them and remember what cars used to be like before Uncle ruined them. And ruined driving – which used to be fun, too. People who are in their ’20s and ’30s today have no memory of what it used to be like. Most have never been in a car with a

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Are old cars for old people?

It seems to be so – if you go by what one typically sees at an old car show. The owners are mostly at least as old as their cars – and most of them are more than 40 years old, which is roughly the line of demarcation between modern cars – those with computers – and those without them, which were last made in the very early ‘80s. 

The owners of pre-computer (and now classic) cars are now “classics” themselves. They are into classic cars because they grew up with them and remember what cars used to be like before Uncle ruined them.

And ruined driving – which used to be fun, too.

People who are in their ’20s and ’30s today have no memory of what it used to be like. Most have never been in a car with a carburetor – and without air bags. They are as unfamiliar with cars that don’t parent them as they are with not being asked for ID and compelled to allow a government goon to evaluate the heft of their genitals prior to getting on an airplane.

Flying used to be fun, too.

It isn’t anymore. It is something to be dealt with – and gotten over with – as  quickly as possible.

Similarly, cars are just appliances to most in their ’20s and ’30s – and driving isn’t fun for anyone because of the endless pestering and constant threat of over-the-top sanctions for trivial offense against arbitrary statutes.

Try to imagine being a 17-year-old kid today and having to deal with “zero tolerance” policies with regard to alcohol – something which most teens still regard as fun. The slightest whiff of beer – and there goes your license.

Imagine being 20 – and no longer a kid, really. Possibly, working full-time. That same whiff costs you not just your license but also your job.

It makes driving not much fun since you can’t go anywhere fun or do much that’s fun.  Unless you’re a nun – and they aren’t supposed to have fun.

This is all on purpose, it should be understood. The process has been gradual, but always with the end in sight – which has always been to alienate people from cars and driving them in order to get them to surrender – willingly, if unknowingly – their personal mobility.

It has been done under the guise of “emissions control” – at first – and then (in tandem) saaaaaaaaaaafety. Finally, in the name of throttling a bogeyman who doesn’t exist – catastrophic, unnatural “climate change” – but which the modern medicine men of the media have confected into a kind of looming Huitzilopochtli who must be appeased else the world will end.

The result of all this is anodyne cars as well as people no longer interested in cars.

Cars with computers are forbidding things compared with the mechanical things most over-40s today grew up with yesterday.

Eric Peters
Eric Peters is a freelance car/bike/political columnist. He escaped the corporate-owned media Big Boys years ago. Without the censorship of the corporate tools

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