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Electric Cars Cost More Than Too Much

Summary:
Electric cars are costing us more than just too much money. They’re also costing jobs. Just in time for Thanksgiving, Audi announced the end of 9,500 of them – to help finance the development of electric cars. “We are now tackling structural issues in order to prepare Audi for the challenges ahead,” said Audi’s CEO Bram Schot. The “structural issues” he speaks of are the outlawing of other-than-electric cars by the German government, effective come 2030. The jobs lost amount to 15 percent of the company’s German workforce and by eliminating them, Audi will “raise” .6 billion – that is, cannibalize itself of that sum – to manufacture products it can’t make money selling but which the German government is forcing them to make.

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Electric cars are costing us more than just too much money.

They’re also costing jobs.

Just in time for Thanksgiving, Audi announced the end of 9,500 of them – to help finance the development of electric cars. “We are now tackling structural issues in order to prepare Audi for the challenges ahead,” said Audi’s CEO Bram Schot.

The “structural issues” he speaks of are the outlawing of other-than-electric cars by the German government, effective come 2030.

The jobs lost amount to 15 percent of the company’s German workforce and by eliminating them, Audi will “raise” $6.6 billion – that is, cannibalize itself of that sum – to manufacture products it can’t make money selling but which the German government is forcing them to make.

Days later, Mercedes-Benz announced it was laying off another 10,000 – for the same reason.

VW Chief Herbet Diess says it could cost 100,000 jobs.

This is the way it ends. Not with a bang but with a whirr.

Electric cars are being used to eliminate cars – and eventually, the car industry.

Along with millions of jobs, once the demolition is complete.

The immediate response to the above will be a charge of Ludditism – you are obviously afraid of change. You are like the carriage-maker at the turn of the last century who saw in the first rude automobiles the dawning of the end of his livelihood.

But there is a critical difference.

Henry Ford changed the world, all right – but with the full and free cooperation of the populace. He offered his cars for sale – to be purchased or not.

t was left to the people to judge the merits – or lack – of his Model T. No one was forced to build one, much less buy one. Nor forced to “help” his neighbor buy one, through income tax-mulcted kickbacks. Ford himself was not able to use the government to get laws passed forcing the horse-and-buggy industry to provide him with funds – “dung credits” – to build his Model T at their expense. Nor did he agitate to have laws passed imposing onerous “emissions” regulations on dung production.

The manufacture of horse-drawn buggies was never restricted, much less outlawed. It simply passed away – peacefully – to make way for a superior free-market alternative.

Electric cars are changing the world at bayonet-point.

Audi is not firing all those people because the work they do is non-productive; quite the opposite. They are being fired to finance government-mandated unproductivity.

he company is cannibalizing itself to scrounge the money needed to build the only kinds of cars the German government will allow Audi to build in the future, which is almost here.

Along with every other car maker doing business in Europe, Audi is being forced to manufacture horse-drawn buggies  – whoops, electric cars – because of laws which forbid the manufacture of anything else.

Not yet – but just around the corner.

Eric Peters
Eric Peters is a freelance car/bike/political columnist. He escaped the corporate-owned media Big Boys years ago. Without the censorship of the corporate tools

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