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‘Never Let a Serious Crisis Go to Waste’

Summary:
“You never want a serious crisis to go to waste. And what I mean by that [is] it’s an opportunity to do things that you think you could not before.” While there may be shortages of toilet paper in America, Judge Andrew P. Napolitano’s column   “Freedom in a Time of Madness” made perfectly clear that authorities in America are at least metaphorically using the Constitution in its place, tyrannically attacking basic human freedoms and rights in the guise of promoting “the greater good” and saving lives. And the headlines as I write this on March 20, 2020 show this dreadful loss of liberty is intensifying in America and throughout the world: Obviously, COVID-19 is changing our lives and not for the better. Ordinary actions that we’d

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“You never want a serious crisis to go to waste. And what I mean by that [is] it’s an opportunity to do things that you think you could not before.”

While there may be shortages of toilet paper in America, Judge Andrew P. Napolitano’s column   “Freedom in a Time of Madness” made perfectly clear that authorities in America are at least metaphorically using the Constitution in its place, tyrannically attacking basic human freedoms and rights in the guise of promoting “the greater good” and saving lives. And the headlines as I write this on March 20, 2020 show this dreadful loss of liberty is intensifying in America and throughout the world:

Obviously, COVID-19 is changing our lives and not for the better. Ordinary actions that we’d do without thinking are now forbidden. I am one of those who does not believe that the ruling Oligarchy has the welfare of ordinary people in mind and may be cynically using this illness not only to cull those who are weaker and are a “drain” on their corrupt financial system, but are taking what they consider their wealth but are also using the “epidemic” for reasons of control.

As to actually avoiding the illness—among others—frequent readers of LewRockwell.com receive excellent health advice regularly by Bill Sardi including his frequent posts on COVID-19, most recently in his “The Coronavirus Is Not Causing Deaths—Weak Immune Systems Are” but there is a concerted effort to deliberately attack and censor potentially life saving advice like Sardi’s.

Recently, Ron Unz posted an overview by Kevin Barrett, which is chilling in what he concludes based on a preponderance of evidence is the agenda of the globalist oligarchy:

Today’s coronavirus black swan, like 9/11, has all the characteristics of a trauma-based mass-mind-control op. It has already been used to demonize China in the same way 9/11 was used to demonize Islam: Just as we were supposed to hate the crazy suicidal Muslims yearning for harems of afterlife virgins, we are now supposed to feel disgust for Chinese slurpers of bat soup. And just as we were supposed to loathe the brutal and incompetent governments of Muslim-majority nations, now we are told to revile the oppressive censorship-addicted regime in Beijing. It may be purely coincidental that this wholesale demonization of the world’s two greatest classical civilizations, based on two fear-inciting black swan events of suspicious origin, just happened to arrive in the wake of the Bernard Lewis-Samuel Huntington pronouncement that the 21st century would be era of the “clash of civilizations.” After all, even the craziest coincidence theories sometimes turn out to be true…

Strategic analysts agree that the necessary prelude to ramped up US-vs.-China warfare would be a decoupling of the US and Chinese economies. That decoupling is happening now, thanks to coronavirus. Once it has passed the point of no return, war becomes far more likely.

Hunkering down for a serious war on China and its allies would also require a momentous psychological and cultural shift on the part of the American people. Until now, they have been lazy, undisciplined, addicted to consumption without much production, and unwilling to sacrifice themselves (though quite willing to murder foreigners from the safe distance of a drone base). Only a profound psychic shock, and some serious deprivation, could retool them as potential soldiers and total war participants in a deadly and dangerous struggle to maintain their rulers’ global dominance privileges. Or so the neocons might imagine.

One can get discouraged by what is occurring, and what is planned but we can resist if we choose, although sadly I suspect the majority of Americas will comply with all the draconian edicts issued and forthcoming. If nothing else we can resist the crushing miasma of fear that is fomented and the agenda towards war as much as possible.

Yet I for one have hope. I believe there is more to life than dominance of the weak over the strong, “the survival of the fittest,” and thus the dogma of Darwinism. I believe in hope. If my faith in my fellow weak and gullible human beings isn’t strong, my faith in God is. Remember Easter is coming. And for those of us who profess Christianity remember Jesus’s words, how we can help and how we must help:

The Parable of the Good Samaritan

25 And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? 26 He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou? 27 And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself. 28 And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live. 29 But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbour?

30 And Jesus answering said, A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which stripped him of his raiment, and wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead. 31 And by chance there came down a certain priest that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. 32 And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side. 33 But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him, 34 And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him. 35 And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee. 36 Which now of these three, thinkest thou, was neighbour unto him that fell among the thieves? 37 And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.

Our neighbors are those in need, the people we meet every day, and especially now. As Pastor Jack Wellman has written:

Who is our neighbor? Whom do you see? Whoever you meet or see today is your neighbor, and the Bible doesn’t specify that only Christians are our neighbors. Our neighbor is anyone that we can help. We have three things to offer…our time, talent, and treasure, so “if anyone has the world’s goods and sees his brother in need, yet closes his heart against him, how does God’s love abide in him” (1 John 3:17)? That’s an excellent question, isn’t it? Perhaps a neighbor, whoever that might be, would reach out for help today. What would be your and my response? “Well, I will pray for you,” but if “one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that” (James 2:16)? That’s another fine question. The best thing we can do for our neighbor is to love them, and the love of God should compel us to share Christ with them. We need to let them know that God demands perfect righteousness to enter the kingdom, but God provides what He demands through Jesus Christ. Who else is sinless, perfect, and completely holy?

There is no reconciliation between us and God without Jesus Christ (Acts 4:12). Telling your neighbor that is the most loving thing you could ever do.

Father Martin Swanson has also written:

What the world needs, and what we are in a unique position to give is love, not the romantic notion of love, which the world promotes, but real Christian love, which is love for God and love for our neighbor. A love that reflects God’s love for us. The kind of love that was shown by the Good Samaritan. A love which sees a need in our fellow man and unselfishly responds without being asked and without expectation of reward. A love which emanates from the love of God and which sees God in all men.

The world has grown cold and has turned love inward. The world has fallen to the sins of pride and selfishness. Pride is a bacterium, which infects not only our souls, but also the souls of those around us. It has infected the whole world causing a great plague. The symptoms of this sickness are selfishness, anger, hatred and depression. As a priest, I talk to a lot of people and I find that a great many people exhibit the symptoms of being infected by pride, and by its offspring, anger. Anger is especially dangerous because it breeds so many other sins. It turns us from Christ, causes us to hate our neighbor, to lose control of our actions, and eventually to despair. Anger is usually aroused when someone has done, or seems to have done, something to us. Something that blocks what we want, something that offends us or threatens us. Anger dominates the soul and destroys any virtue that we have managed to build in ourselves. It is very difficult to deal with anger, hatred and depression because the anecdote—humility—is a difficult pill to swallow. This is especially true today when we are taught that we must love ourselves in order to be complete human beings, and that we must take pride in what we do. Pride is elevated to the status of a virtue, and being selfish as a key to success. And, when we don’t get what we want, we get angry. Anger eventually turns to depression. Depression because we somehow have not gotten what we deserve, our future looks bleak, there is no hope for us—only death. However, a far greater tragedy in all of this is the death of the soul. In order to strive for what is Godly, in order to love our neighbor, in order to come out of the darkness into the light, and in order to bring others to Christ, we must heal the disease which lingers within us. We must acquire the Spirit of God, which is the cure for our enslavement to the passions. In this is true freedom from passion, and true peace, such as the world cannot understand…

Christ comes to us everyday in disguises—He walks among us, and we don’t recognize Him. Maybe that’s because we’re looking for the wrong thing? Christ walks among us not as the image that we see in our icons. He comes to us as an ordinary person, as our brother or sister, our neighbor, our friend and our enemy and yes, even as the outcasts of society—the untouchable, the naked, the poor, the sick, the heretic and the atheist all are in need of our assistance. Real love is exhibited in love for all men, especially for the least of our brethren. For these too are all born to become members of Christ, living parts of Christ’s body (Eph. 4 & 5, Cor. 6: 15). We are all growing within a living organism into the Church, whose head is Christ. Therefore, through love, we must help the spiritual growth and progress of one another. When one part of the body makes progress this is for the good of the whole body. When one part of the body is sick, the whole body suffers. Our love for our neighbor serves the health of both our neighbor and ourselves. Love is health; hatred is sickness. Love is salvation; hatred is damnation. In truth it can be said that all good that we are capable of doing comes from love of God and neighbor. Likewise it can also be said that all the sins that have ever been are sins against love, either for God or for our neighbor. It can be said to that both heaven and earth depend upon love.

What is happening now is not making me fearful or angry but sorrowful; yet as a Christian I have been given guidance how to act. Recently, the site Russian-Faith posted their response to the Coronavirus, which is the balm of sacred music. Vera Reid wrote, “Global anxiety has reached an apex; debilitating and all-consuming, it paralyses so many of us in fear or hopelessness or anger. Of course, our descent into chronic anxiety began many decades ago: it fuels our fast-paced lives, our never-ending economic concerns, our desperate avoidance and fear of discomfort and death.

“Music, one of the greatest gifts of God to humanity, has an almost mysterious effect on us. To help ourselves, as well as all our readers, keep the light of inner peace glowing in this time of distress, we have decided Russian Faith will regularly publish beautiful church music during this crisis.

“For anxiety is not the way of the Christian.”

Inspired by faith, new, wonderful compositions have been created. I recently heard for the first time through Russian-Faith a work I’d never knew existed before, composed by the head of the Georgian Church, Patriarch Ilya II and performed by Mariam Roinishvili and Trinity Cathedral Choir:

“There are only two words in the chant: ‘Kyrie Eleison,’ which in Greek means ‘Lord, Have Mercy.’ Perhaps, the simplicity and minimalism of the prayer are what makes it so powerful.”

May all sacred music and faith inspire and give you courage and hope.

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