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Discrimination Insanity

Summary:
I don’t watch or follow football, but it has nothing to do with Colin Kaepernick or the militarization of the NFL pre-game show. I haven’t watched a football game since before Kaepernick was born. I did watch football when I was much younger, and remember playing the game after school with my friends around the neighborhood when I was in junior high. Although I don’t watch or follow football, and couldn’t tell you what teams played in the last Super Bowl or will play in the upcoming Super Bowl, two recent articles about football caught my attention because they concerned the supposed bias and discrimination against blacks being head coaches. In “Agent expects ‘exodus’ of black coaches from the NFL to college football,” the writer

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I don’t watch or follow football, but it has nothing to do with Colin Kaepernick or the militarization of the NFL pre-game show. I haven’t watched a football game since before Kaepernick was born. I did watch football when I was much younger, and remember playing the game after school with my friends around the neighborhood when I was in junior high.

Although I don’t watch or follow football, and couldn’t tell you what teams played in the last Super Bowl or will play in the upcoming Super Bowl, two recent articles about football caught my attention because they concerned the supposed bias and discrimination against blacks being head coaches.

In “Agent expects ‘exodus’ of black coaches from the NFL to college football,” the writer laments that Kansas City Chiefs’ Eric Bieniemy (a black man) was passed up for the head coach job at the New York Giants and that New England Patriots wide receivers coach Joe Judge (a white man) was hired instead. He quotes a Washington Post columnist who projects “a small exodus of black assistants from NFL to college ranks because ‘they’re starting to feel like there’s no future for them in the NFL.’”

In “How the NFL continues to fail coaching candidates of color,” the writer says that “the current state of black head coaching candidates, and other candidates of color, should be a much bigger concern than it is.” He quotes a recent study that concluded that “black coaches have long struggled to find the same opportunities their white colleagues receive, regardless of experience or success.”

This is discrimination insanity. From what I remember about football, the desire of each team is to win. Are we really to believe that in 2020, NFL teams would deliberately pass over a more qualified black man for a head coaching position so they could hire a less qualified white man?

The insanity is even worse.

According to Black Demographics, blacks make up about 13.4 percent of the population in the United States. Those who identify as “black only” or “black in combination with another race” make up about 14.6 percent of the population.

As recently as the 2018 football season, seven NFL teams out of the 32 teams in the league had black head coaches:

  • Hue Jackson (Cleveland)
  • Marvin Lewis (Cincinnati)
  • Steve Wilks (Arizona)
  • Vance Joseph (Denver)
  • Todd Bowles (Jets)
  • Anthony Lynn (Chargers)
  • Mike Tomlin (Steelers)

This is 21.875 percent—well above the percentage of blacks who make up the population.

And just when you thought the insanity couldn’t get any worse, as acknowledged by the writer of “How the NFL continues to fail coaching candidates of color” in the first line of his article, about 70 percent of the NFL’s players are black. Even worse, you have to look long and hard to find a white running back or wide receiver.

In the interest of fairness, equity, and justice, are those who believe that blacks are being discriminated against when it comes to head coaching positions willing to also say that whites are being discriminated against when it comes to playing in the NFL?

I didn’t think so.

Laurence M. Vance
Laurence M. Vance is an author, a publisher, a lecturer, a freelance writer, the editor of the Classic Reprints series, and the director of the Francis Wayland Institute. He holds degrees in history, theology, accounting, and economics. The author of twenty-four books, he has contributed over 700 articles and book reviews to both secular and religious periodicals.

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