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The Trouble With Covid ‘Cases’

Summary:
I had a “case” of headache this morning – probably from reading (again) about all the new “cases” of WuFlu. What is it with this “cases” thing? Does the media really not understand the difference between “cases” of something and whether people die from it? Lot of “cases” of headache in this country. Also indigestion, menopause and acne. If the media reported the daily tally of these, you’d think there was a  . . . crisis. Of course, the media does not do this. And didn’t do it, previously, with the common cold or the seasonal flu. If it had done so we’d have been “locked down” and  wearing face diapers years ago. There are millions of “cases” of  these things every year – in part because there are hundreds of millions of people

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I had a “case” of headache this morning – probably from reading (again) about all the new “cases” of WuFlu. What is it with this “cases” thing? Does the media really not understand the difference between “cases” of something and whether people die from it?

Lot of “cases” of headache in this country.

Also indigestion, menopause and acne. If the media reported the daily tally of these, you’d think there was a  . . . crisis. Of course, the media does not do this. And didn’t do it, previously, with the common cold or the seasonal flu. If it had done so we’d have been “locked down” and  wearing face diapers years ago. There are millions of “cases” of  these things every year – in part because there are hundreds of millions of people in the country and it’s inevitable a percentage of them will get sick each year.

This never used to be considered a “crisis.” It was normal because it was life. Including, sometimes, death.

In 1799, George Washington caught a cold while riding the fence line during a snowstorm in December at his Mount Vernon home; being an older guy at this time, the cold worsened and – we don’t know for sure, but the evidence suggests – developed into pneumonia, which is hard to shake when you’re older, especially when the quack doctors attending you decide to bleed you as the “cure.”

Washington died – but the country wasn’t locked down. Because in those days, Americans understood that getting sick was part of life, especially when most people didn’t die because they caught a cold.

But then, in 1799 there was also no saturation media – able to speak with one very loud voice – drum-rolling a horrific-sounding “case” count on the hour, accompanied by lurid graphics and ominous implications.

The latter italicized to make the point which they always do – without actually saying it.

The daily “case” count is intended to make the viewer believe that mass death will follow. They practically lead the poor horse’s muzzle to the water trough. It is a deliberate attempt to pump up the numbers when the relevant number – the percentage of “cases” who end up dead – continues to decrease. Not just in numbers but also percentages – which is a function of the number of  “cases.”

An excellent example of this deliberate (it has to be – stupidity and journalistic negligence can no longer account for what is going on; it is too blatant at this point) shell game of death is the reportage of what is going on in South Dakota.

Or rather, what hasn’t.

This state is one of the only ones not “locked down” – because it has a governor, Kristi Noem, who does not believe in practicing what she calls “herd leadership,” by which she means imposing on South Dakotans what has been imposed on New Yorkers, Californians and Virginians, oh my!

Meaning, she left it up to South Dakotans to lead themselves. To weigh the risk of getting sick vs. the risk of getting dead and weigh those things against the certainty of going broke or out of business and leading a sad, neurotic, Face-Diapered life as the “new normal.”

Eric Peters
Eric Peters is a freelance car/bike/political columnist. He escaped the corporate-owned media Big Boys years ago. Without the censorship of the corporate tools

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