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Paine, Jefferson, and the Fear Mask

Summary:
In the years just before the American movement for separation from Great Britain (it was not a “revolution,” properly speaking, as the American separatists had no desire to transform the government of Great Britain; they merely wished to be free of it) there was something called the committees of correspondence. They were the 18th century equivalent of non-“authoritative” (i.e., official/corporate-government propaganda) Internet sites, such as the one you’re reading right now. A means by which people could share information – especially heretical information – among themselves, sidestepping the “authoritative” pabulum. They spread more than information, too.  They also spread hope, almost as important as the information itself.

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In the years just before the American movement for separation from Great Britain (it was not a “revolution,” properly speaking, as the American separatists had no desire to transform the government of Great Britain; they merely wished to be free of it) there was something called the committees of correspondence.

They were the 18th century equivalent of non-“authoritative” (i.e., official/corporate-government propaganda) Internet sites, such as the one you’re reading right now. A means by which people could share information – especially heretical information – among themselves, sidestepping the “authoritative” pabulum.

They spread more than information, too.  They also spread hope, almost as important as the information itself. The people reading and back-and-forthing realized they were not alone. That others – intelligent, thoughtful people – shared their views.

The importance of this cannot be overstated.

They powers arrayed then – as now – count on isolation to demoralize the opposition. It is not mere coincidence that “social distancing” accompanies the tyrannizing of Americans today. People can’t easily communicate when they have to shout because they’re forced to stand no closer than six feet from the people they’re trying to talk with – and aren’t permitted to gather in groups.

Even their commerce must be conducted remotely – via “apps” and such. They wait curbside for a Fear Masker to hurriedly push the (sanitized) bag through the window.

And, of course, it is very hard to communicate ideas – and facts – contrary to all of this when the public discourse is subject to the approval (and redaction) of “authoritative” Lictors of the Allowable.

It is not coincidental that Fear Masking rises – even as the cold-equals-death narrative has become as transparently ridiculous as the “weapons of mass destruction” narrative – because millions of Americans are being programmed – the word has dual meaning – by their TeeVees and the other “authoritative” sources of orthodoxy. It is just as important – from the standpoint of the people behind the programming – to terrify people as to isolate them.

In the years preceding the outbreak of physical resistance to the British government, the government of Great Britain did the same. It warned the people of the American colonies that without the protection of the redcoats, they would be at the mercy of savage indians and rampaging French – the Coronavirus equivalents of the 18th century.

The fear, of course, was much greater than the threat – then as now.

But the good news- and we need it – is that we have even more effective means of discussing this truth among ourselves and spreading the truth to others, who join our side every day the “authoritative” elaboration of falsehood continues. It is critically important – psychologically – to understand that.

The Lictors of the Allowable will do all they can to prevent us knowing that.

Eric Peters
Eric Peters is a freelance car/bike/political columnist. He escaped the corporate-owned media Big Boys years ago. Without the censorship of the corporate tools

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