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Hellenic Panic

Summary:
Aristophanes was a comic genius before the Marx Brothers, but he also gave good advice to the Athenians: Stop the war! In his play Lysistrata he had the women going on strike—no more nookie—until the men stopped fighting. During the plague that killed the greatest Athenian of them all, Pericles, Aristophanes advised the young to isolate, meditate, and masturbate, advice still valid to this day. Greece, with roughly the same population as Switzerland, and under siege by migrants turned loose by the dreaded Turks, has handled the crisis well. Unlike the American media that is using the virus crisis in order to attack Trump, the Greek people will not tolerate such craven opportunism and dishonesty. Criticism of the government is

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Aristophanes was a comic genius before the Marx Brothers, but he also gave good advice to the Athenians: Stop the war! In his play Lysistrata he had the women going on strike—no more nookie—until the men stopped fighting. During the plague that killed the greatest Athenian of them all, Pericles, Aristophanes advised the young to isolate, meditate, and masturbate, advice still valid to this day.

Greece, with roughly the same population as Switzerland, and under siege by migrants turned loose by the dreaded Turks, has handled the crisis well. Unlike the American media that is using the virus crisis in order to attack Trump, the Greek people will not tolerate such craven opportunism and dishonesty. Criticism of the government is almost nonexistent, as the suddenly wise populace is united against the unseen menace. God knows poor Greece has had enough thunderbolts aimed at her, starting ten years ago with the eurozone’s incompatible economic demands. I remember well writing an article pleading with the then prime minister, an arrogant euro asslicker by the name of Samaras, to return to a devalued drachma and not sacrifice the savings and welfare of millions in order to have motorcycle escorts while entering Brussels. Like all craven cowards he chose the motorcycles.

Louis de Bernières recently wrote in The Telegraph something that touched me about my birthplace: He ran into Lord Owen and the ex–foreign minister told him that he had become a Leaver because of what had been done to Greece. (David Owen has a summer house in the Peloponnese.) The country that was reduced to penury by Brussels was the only country that stood beside Britain in 1940 and managed to humiliate Mussolini’s troops and drive them back into Albania. While this was going on, Belgium, Holland, and France had obliged the Wehrmacht and had folded like a cheap accordion. Not us Greeks, and my mother had five brothers (all Spartans) at the front during the first week of the war. What made Metaxas and King George and all the Greeks defy the Axis? (The Italians had only asked for free access to the Middle East.) After all, they had nothing to gain, and the combined Axis forces meant certain defeat. I suppose it was pride of our heroic past, and battles like Thermopylae and Marathon, that fired up the nation.

Sure, the Greeks took a free ride with E.U. moola for quite a while, but we were never ready to be admitted in the first place, so why the severe punishment? Is it because we did the right thing back in 1940? Is it because we did the right thing again in 1947, when we defeated the Stalin-backed Reds? Or is it because we forgave German reparations after a decent interval following the war? No to all three; it was because we were easy to bully and were led by midgets. Now the chickens have come home to roost, as they say in Alabama.

Taki Theodoracopulos
Taki Theodoracopulos (born August 11, 1936), originally named Panagiotis Theodoracopulos and best known as Taki, is a Greek journalist and writer living in New York City, London and Gstaad, Switzerland.

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