Sunday , July 12 2020
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Madness Is Contagious

Summary:
GSTAAD—Oh, to be in America, where cultural decay and self-destruction compete equally with hyperfeminist and anti-racist agendas. Gone With the Wind is suddenly as popular as Triumph of the Will is in Israel, and the great Robert E. Lee’s statue in Richmond is as likely to remain upright as a Ku Klux Klan rally in Harlem. I give the statue of my hero a week at the most. And over here poor old Winnie is also in the you-know-what. Why didn’t anyone tell me Churchill was a Nazi? The Cenotaph also has to go—those guys it honors were racists. Two weeks ago in The Spectator Douglas Murray said it all about a U.S. import we can do without. Alas, when Uncle Sam sneezes, the British bulldog gets the flu. The scenes may be less dramatic

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GSTAAD—Oh, to be in America, where cultural decay and self-destruction compete equally with hyperfeminist and anti-racist agendas. Gone With the Wind is suddenly as popular as Triumph of the Will is in Israel, and the great Robert E. Lee’s statue in Richmond is as likely to remain upright as a Ku Klux Klan rally in Harlem. I give the statue of my hero a week at the most. And over here poor old Winnie is also in the you-know-what. Why didn’t anyone tell me Churchill was a Nazi? The Cenotaph also has to go—those guys it honors were racists.

Two weeks ago in The Spectator Douglas Murray said it all about a U.S. import we can do without. Alas, when Uncle Sam sneezes, the British bulldog gets the flu. The scenes may be less dramatic over here, but the hypocrisy is the same, if not more so. (Get killed fighting for your country in Waterloo à la Picton, and have some tattooed ganja seller tear your statue down.) Should we Greeks destroy our monuments to, say, Pericles because he had slaves? (Try it in Athens, assholes, and see how far you get.)

I don’t know why—perhaps because I’m a naive little Greek boy—but all these race activists and celebrities doing the outrage remind me of Melmotte selling his phony shares. I regularly speak with film director James Toback, who is in the Bagel writing his memoirs—his description of the first time he dropped LSD at Harvard, with cars flying through the windows at him, is brilliant—and even for a man never at a loss for words, Jimmy had trouble depicting the disaster that is Mayor de Blasio: “Fossils dating from 2.1 billion years ago in the seabed would be more effective than this clown.”

Freedom of speech in the good old U.S. of A (as well as the U.K.) makes Germany in 1940 and the U.S.S.R. in 1950 resemble Speakers’ Corner by comparison. Any deviation from woke speech means instant dismissal from work, even if you’re the boss, especially if you’re the boss. Today’s climate is one of fear that makes Orwell’s 1984 read like a children’s book. Say “All Lives Matter” or “Buildings Matter” and lose your job or position quicker than presumption of innocence went out the window in the Woody Allen case. Anything interpreted as racist is a death sentence, one applied by self-appointed woke judges in the media, academe, and the arts. Mind you, real murder is also giving it the old college try. Both New York and Chicago are having a back-to-the-future moment, with seven people shot over the course of ten minutes in Brooklyn last week, in forty shootings and nineteen murders. Chicago, always trying to catch up with the Bagel, did much better: Eighteen people were killed in cold blood, young men and women, all African-Americans, in mostly random violence by gangs of African-Americans. (I don’t think the propaganda sheet that the N.Y. Times has become even bothered to report it.)

Taki Theodoracopulos
Taki Theodoracopulos (born August 11, 1936), originally named Panagiotis Theodoracopulos and best known as Taki, is a Greek journalist and writer living in New York City, London and Gstaad, Switzerland.

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