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The Specter of One World Government Looms Large

Summary:
The U.N.’s Agenda 2030 is still in place, and the clock is ticking toward its empowerment — only eight years and two-plus months to go.  This Agenda is for a new world government, which will implement the policies of the Agenda. This new government on our horizon explains many of the failures in policies in these first months of the Biden administration.  The failures are based not so much on mistakes as on deliberate sabotage to weaken our country, dilute the power that undergirds our sovereignty, and prepare us to accept one world government. The seed ideas for Agenda 2030 began with Pres. Woodrow Wilson’s League of Nations in his Fourteen Points at the end of WWI.  A community of nations could bring pressure for peace in the world that the treaty or alliance system could

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The U.N.’s Agenda 2030 is still in place, and the clock is ticking toward its empowerment — only eight years and two-plus months to go.  This Agenda is for a new world government, which will implement the policies of the Agenda.

This new government on our horizon explains many of the failures in policies in these first months of the Biden administration.  The failures are based not so much on mistakes as on deliberate sabotage to weaken our country, dilute the power that undergirds our sovereignty, and prepare us to accept one world government.

The seed ideas for Agenda 2030 began with Pres. Woodrow Wilson’s League of Nations in his Fourteen Points at the end of WWI.  A community of nations could bring pressure for peace in the world that the treaty or alliance system could not do, as shown by the First World War.  While this idea took hold in Europe and other countries, it was unable to gain sufficient traction in the U.S. as it met with Republican resistance in the U.S. Senate on the grounds that it would lead to a dilution of U.S. sovereignty.

With the benefit of 20-20 hindsight, all right-thinking persons can see that Woodrow Wilson’s first giant step toward globalism was rightly rejected.  The League was a complete failure in terms of bringing peace to the world.  To the German Nazi government, the League was a joke.  The Japanese left the League after their invasion of China was repudiated.  Yet Republican sway over U.S. governance became diminished by the four-time election of Franklin D. Roosevelt as president of the U.S. and the hegemony of the Democrat party for twenty years from 1933 to 1953.

After WWII, the U.N. was conceived of as having duties and functions that the League did not have.  The U.N. would sustain the world in real ways with the establishment of the International Monetary Fund to strengthen currencies worldwide and the World Bank to finance and endorse vast construction projects.  These institutions would together foster peace and “community” in our fragmented world (whispers of the “it takes a village” cliché that would take hold decades later).  After all, is it not true that poverty is ultimately the cause of conflict in our world?

Yes, the U.S. and the other illogical leftists throughout the West and the other parts of the world bought in to the Marxist idea that wars are caused by fierce competition for scarce resources.  Even the great Harvard economist Walt Rostow in the 1950s and 1960s had a vision of global financial institutions through the sponsorship of the U.N. as bringing the poorest countries to a “take-off stage.”  There was only one problem with Prof. Rostow’s well researched and theoretically sound vision: take-off never happened.  All that great Harvard research was not worth the paper it was written on.  The wealth disparities among the developed world, the less developed countries (LDCs), and the less developed developing countries (LDDCs) persisted.

As a result of the perceived stratification of the world community, there was a paradigm shift in understanding the relations among the different wealth levels of societies.  Many on the left believed that if the whole world were one, then the destitution and resulting despair of the poorer countries could not be dismissed as a failure of local nation-state governments to enact good policies or to be less corrupt.  If, so to speak, all nations were under the same roof or same umbrella, the thought “that’s their problem” could not easily obtain.

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