Monday , January 18 2021
Home / James Broughel /The Mortality Cost of Expenditures

The Mortality Cost of Expenditures

Summary:
This paper updates the mortality cost of expenditures, which has relevance to a broad range of policies, including regulations, wars, and COVID‐19 restrictions. Because changes in income lead to changes in mortality risk, health investments costing more per life saved than a threshold cost‐per‐life‐saved cutoff level are expected to increase mortality risk. This article discusses the mechanisms driving this relationship and provides recent empirical support. The 2019 cost‐per‐life‐saved cutoff level at which expenditures increase mortality risk has a lower bound of .1 million and an upper bound of 3.8 million, with a midpoint of 8.5 million.

Topics:
James Broughel considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Tyler Durden writes An OrWELLSian Purge? Why H.G. Wells’ “The Shape Of Things To Come” Has Arrived Today

Tyler Durden writes “Tough Months Ahead” – NYC’s Lackluster Recovery Continues To Decimate Businesses And Livelihoods

Tyler Durden writes What Will WHO Experts Find During Their Wuhan Trip?

Tyler Durden writes Goldman Sounds The Alarm On Stocks: When Euphoria Is This High, “It’s A Good Time To Reduce Risk”

This paper updates the mortality cost of expenditures, which has relevance to a broad range of policies, including regulations, wars, and COVID‐19 restrictions. Because changes in income lead to changes in mortality risk, health investments costing more per life saved than a threshold cost‐per‐life‐saved cutoff level are expected to increase mortality risk. This article discusses the mechanisms driving this relationship and provides recent empirical support. The 2019 cost‐per‐life‐saved cutoff level at which expenditures increase mortality risk has a lower bound of $83.1 million and an upper bound of $133.8 million, with a midpoint of $108.5 million. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *