Friday , August 23 2019
Home / Mises Institute USA / Forerunners of the Austrian School: The French Liberal School

Forerunners of the Austrian School: The French Liberal School

Summary:
The French Liberal School had been dominant through four generations because they were privately funded, but when the government intervened in the French universities the Liberal School lost its hold. Richard Cantillon, Etienne Bonnot de Condillac, A.R.J. Turgot, Jean-Baptiste Say, Frederic Bastiat, and Michel Chevalier were responsible for economic concepts such as opportunity cost, the ...

Topics:
Joseph T. Salerno considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Madsen Pirie writes What the Nazi-Soviet Pact entailed

Tyler Durden writes Futures Hit After Global Times Warns Beijing Will Soon Unveil Retaliatory Tariff

Tyler Durden writes Chinese Equity Analyst Says He Faced “Heavy Pressure” To Cut Rating On Cathay Pacific

Tyler Durden writes One Of The Largest TBTF Banks In America Boldly Declares “The Wheels For A Slowdown Are In Motion”

The French Liberal School had been dominant through four generations because they were privately funded, but when the government intervened in the French universities the Liberal School lost its hold. Richard Cantillon, Etienne Bonnot de Condillac, A.R.J. Turgot, Jean-Baptiste Say, Frederic Bastiat, and Michel Chevalier were responsible for economic concepts such as opportunity cost, the entrepreneur as risk-bearer, monetary theory, cause and effect methodology, utility, economic liberalism, and Say’s Law.

Both in Great Britain and the United States during 1870-1890, the French Liberal School was hated and denigrated. The American Economic Association was started in 1880. There was no room for the liberals.

The History of Economic Doctrine, which appeared in 1947, claimed the French Liberal School, which they now called the Optimist School, had abandoned the task of scientific investigation.

Lecture 1 of 10 from  Joseph T. Salerno's Revisionist History and Contemporary Theory.

Joseph T. Salerno
Joseph T. Salerno is an Austrian School economist in the United States. He is a professor at Pace University, an editor of the Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, and Academic Vice President of the Mises Institute. Salerno specializes in monetary theory and policy, comparative economics, and the history of economic thought. Dr. Salerno received his Ph.D. in economics from Rutgers University. His most recent publication is Money: Sound and Unsound.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *