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Fun on Friday: Somebody Finally Found the Buried Treasure

Summary:
You can stop looking now. It took 10 years but somebody finally found the treasure.A decade ago, millionaire art dealer Forrest Fenn hid a real-live treasure chest full of gold nuggets and precious stones in the Rocky Mountains. Then he invited the world to go on a treasure hunt.The world obliged.Three years ago, Fenn estimated that at least 250,000 people had actively looked for the stash.The only clues he left were a map and a poem.“The ornate, Romanesque box is 10-by-10 inches and weighs about 40 pounds when loaded,” NPR’s John Burnett reported in 2016. “Fenn has only revealed that it is hidden in the Rocky Mountains, somewhere between Santa Fe and the Canadian border at an elevation above 5,000 feet. It’s not in a mine, a graveyard or near a structure.”The treasure was reportedly

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You can stop looking now. It took 10 years but somebody finally found the treasure.

A decade ago, millionaire art dealer Forrest Fenn hid a real-live treasure chest full of gold nuggets and precious stones in the Rocky Mountains. Then he invited the world to go on a treasure hunt.

The world obliged.

Three years ago, Fenn estimated that at least 250,000 people had actively looked for the stash.

The only clues he left were a map and a poem.

“The ornate, Romanesque box is 10-by-10 inches and weighs about 40 pounds when loaded,” NPR’s John Burnett reported in 2016. “Fenn has only revealed that it is hidden in the Rocky Mountains, somewhere between Santa Fe and the Canadian border at an elevation above 5,000 feet. It’s not in a mine, a graveyard or near a structure.”

The treasure was reportedly worth some $2 million.

Check out. Gold is valuable.

Fenn first revealed the clues in a self-published book, The Thrill of the Chase.

According to Fenn, the treasure was hidden “under a canopy of stars in the lush, forested vegetation of the Rocky Mountains and had not moved from the spot where I hid it more than 10 years ago.”

On a side note, I’ve got a question. Was the treasure still hidden during the day? Did you have to find it at night? Because there is no canopy of stars during the day. Just sayin’.

Anyway, Fenn did not reveal the name of the lucky treasure hunter, saying the find was confirmed by a photo, but the individual wanted to stay anonymous.

As an NPR report put it, the hunt became a dangerous obsession for some. At least four people died seeking Fenn’s treasure.

So, here’s a question for you. Would you risk your life tromping through the mountains with the possibility of a $2 million payoff?

I probably would. But I have to be honest, I would have been dead in the water with these particular clues.

In the first place, I have never been particularly good at getting the symbolism in poems. Don’t get me wrong, I love poetry. But hidden meanings tend to allude me. I was the kid who stared at the English teacher with that “I don’t get it” look when she was explaining the symbolism in “The Old Man and the Sea.” Hemingway apparently buried all kinds of hidden meaning in that story, but all I ever got out of it was was an old man riding around in a boat page after page after page.

But never fear, Fenn provided a map, right?

Well, also not helpful. I am the guy who can get turned around and lost even with the Google Maps lady giving directions. I mean. It’s bad. People make fun of me. And unfortunately, I passed this on to my daughter. We once spent 40 minutes looking for my car on the campus of the University of Northern Kentucky. Turns out we were in the wrong parking lot on the opposite side of campus.

So yeah, treasure hunting with a poem and a map isn’t for me.

Fortunately, I know an easier way to get gold. I just call a SchiffGold precious metals specialist. No map or poem interpretation required! I also don’t have to hike and worry about ticks. That’s always a plus.

Fun on Friday: Somebody Finally Found the Buried Treasure

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