Tuesday , July 14 2020
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Fun on Friday: Trust Me…

Summary:
So, I’m just going to throw this out there. If you get an email from a couple of veterans who claim they rescued a sultan’s son and got a big payout in gold, it might be a scam.Maybe.And by maybe, I mean it’s a scam.This is actually a thing. I ran across it on a Chicago police blotter.According to the report, an elderly man received an email supposedly from two veterans claiming they received a delivery of gold for rescuing the sultan’s son. But of course, they couldn’t afford to store their windfall prior to returning to the US. They said they just needed ,000.The report doesn’t say, but I’m sure our intrepid vets offered the old feller a handsome payout in gold for his trouble.Thankfully, bank employees questioned the old man’s request for 12-grand and explained that the email was

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So, I’m just going to throw this out there. If you get an email from a couple of veterans who claim they rescued a sultan’s son and got a big payout in gold, it might be a scam.

Maybe.

And by maybe, I mean it’s a scam.

This is actually a thing. I ran across it on a Chicago police blotter.

According to the report, an elderly man received an email supposedly from two veterans claiming they received a delivery of gold for rescuing the sultan’s son. But of course, they couldn’t afford to store their windfall prior to returning to the US. They said they just needed $12,000.

The report doesn’t say, but I’m sure our intrepid vets offered the old feller a handsome payout in gold for his trouble.

Thankfully, bank employees questioned the old man’s request for 12-grand and explained that the email was a scam.

Now, when I see emails like this, and I get them every day, my hand doesn’t even pause on the way to hitting the delete button. But do you know why these spammy emails and online scams persist? Because people fall for them.

And it’s not just the elderly.

All kinds of people fall for scams because, well, a lot of people are gullible.

I think in general, people tend to be pretty trusting. They’re prone to believe what they read. Not me, mind you. In fact, I am so skeptical, I probably dismiss some things I believe. The plus side to that is that I don’t tend to click strange links in emails. or withdraw large amounts of case and send it off to Nigeria. But I don’t think I represent the norm. (For some reason, I’ve been told that on multiple occasions.) Most people are just too trusting. If I say, “Trust me,” they’ll say, “OK, sure.”

These were the people that led PT Barnum to say, “There’s a sucker born every minute.”

See, you probably believe Barnum said that. He didn’t. At least there is no evidence that he did. It’s one of those things that we’re told over and over again and we reflexively believe it. I mean, why should we doubt what we’re told?

I’ll tell you why; people are liars.

They send out emails claiming they rescued a sultan’s son and need you to help the store their gold so they can bilk you out of $12,000. It’s sad. But it’s the world we live in.

At any rate, the point I’m driving at here is that we should be critical of things we read on the interwebs and that includes emails from strangers.  It’s kind of like what my mom used to tell me when I was a kid: “Don’t believe everything you see on TV.” We should apply that wisdom to the internet and our email inbox.

Except this.

You can accept everything I say as 100% correct.

Let’s practice.

You should buy gold.

You clicked, right? See, that wasn’t so hard!

But in all seriousness, buying gold really is a good idea for a lot of reasons. You don’t have to take my word for it. After all, I’m just a guy on the internet. Check and verify.  A SchiffGold precious metals specialist can help with that. No worries – they’re on the phone! Or you can email [email protected]

Fun on Friday: Trust Me…

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