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Tag Archives: Academic Philosophy

Epistemic Liberalism and Open Borders

The following interview is republished from the blog at the Centre for the Study of Governance and Society at King’s College London, a leading research center examining how formal and informal rules of governance operate and evolve, and how these rules facilitate or imperil peaceful, prosperous and ecologically secure societies. Follow them on Twitter @csgskcl.  Adam Tebble is a Senior Lecturer in Political Theory at King’s College London. The following interview is based on his...

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Commercial Republicanism: A New Center-Right Governing Philosophy

Editor’s Note: The following essay is reprinted with permission from the Niskanen’s Center “Defending the Open Society” series. Read more here. You can read more from Robert S. Taylor on republican political theory in his new book,Exit Left: Markets and Mobility in Republican Thought. The 2016 elections transformed the Republican Party—and not for the better. A party that had been deeply committed since Goldwater and Reagan to the open society, limited government, and global...

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Randians vs. Stoics

Stoicism, particularly in its ethical and political aspects (a defense of individual self-mastery on the one hand and commercial society on the other – for the latter, see, e.g., Cicero’s De Officiis), has been enormously influential throughout western history. During the Roman period it took on something like the character of a mass religious movement; Stoics were also statistically overrepresented among assassins or attempted assassins of Roman emperors. (One third of all Roman...

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Political Activism and Research Ethics Revisited

If you spend any time in academia, it’s not hard to find researchers engaging in political activism. In fact, there often are norms encouraging it. In an influential article, BHL contributor Bas van der Vossen says that approach is all wrong. Researchers who study politics should avoid activism, he argues, because it raises the risk of biasing their work. I encourage you to read Bas’s argument if you haven’t already. I’m sympathetic to the motivations behind it....

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Forthcoming Anthology on Dialectical Libertarianism

Check out Chris Matthew Sciabarra’s announcement for his forthcoming anthology Dialectics of Liberty: Exploring the Context of Human Freedom (edited by Sciabarra, Roger Bissell, and Edward Younkins) here, and the abstracts of chapters here. Contributors include Jason Lee Byas, Robert Campbell, Troy Camplin, Kevin Carson, Gary Chartier, Billy Christmas, Douglas Den Uyl, Nathan Goodman, Robert Higgs, Steven Horwitz, Stephan Kinsella, Deirdre McCloskey, David Prychitko, Douglas...

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Governing Least: A New England Libertarianism

My thanks to BHL for the invitation to give an overview of Governing Least: a New England Libertarianism. (OUP may have copies if Amazon is out.) A one-sentence summary of each chapter can be found here. The goal of this book is to promote two ideas, one substantive, one methodological. Substantively, the book defends a version of libertarianism with modest moral foundations that doesn’t make any appeal to absolute rights. Instead, the suggestion is that doubts about...

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Anarchy in Manhattan

The Molinari Society will be holding its mostly-annual Eastern Symposium in conjunction with the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association in New York City, 7-10 January 2019. Here’s the schedule info: Molinari Society symposium: New Work in Libertarian and Anarchist Thought G5C. Tuesday, 8 January 2019, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, 811 7th Ave. (at W. 53rd St.), New York NY, room TBA chair:      Roderick T. Long (Auburn University)...

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Anarchy in Manhattan

The Molinari Society will be holding its mostly-annual Eastern Symposium in conjunction with the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association in New York City, 7-10 January 2019. Here’s the schedule info: Molinari Society symposium: New Work in Libertarian and Anarchist Thought G5C. Tuesday, 8 January 2019, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, 811 7th Ave. (at W. 53rd St.), New York NY, room TBA chair:      Roderick T. Long (Auburn University)...

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The Purpose of Political Philosophy Is to Rationalize Evil

I deleted this section from an earlier draft of When All Else Fails.  But this still seems like an apt theory to me: the de re if not de dicto goal of political philosophy is to produce theories which justify holding government and its agents to low moral standards. (See, e.g., Henry, Chris, or John at Crooked Timber.) The Vulcans appreciated the nice things I said about them in my previous books.[i]To express gratitude, they invited me to visit planet Vulcan to lecture on the...

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The Purpose of Political Philosophy Is to Rationalize Evil

I deleted this section from an earlier draft of When All Else Fails.  But this still seems like an apt theory to me: the de re if not de dicto goal of political philosophy is to produce theories which justify holding government and its agents to low moral standards. (See, e.g., Henry, Chris, or John at Crooked Timber.) The Vulcans appreciated the nice things I said about them in my previous books.[i]To express gratitude, they invited me to visit planet Vulcan to lecture on the...

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