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Home / Tag Archives: Budget Issues

Tag Archives: Budget Issues

Some Non-Covid Links

Art Carden celebrates the 50th birthday of my great, brilliant, and amazingly creative colleague Bryan Caplan. A slice: Poverty: Who’s to Blame? promises to be controversial. As he has argued in lectures he has given on the book’s themes, we can blame third-world governments for lousy policy and first-world governments for immigration restrictions. So far, so good. The most controversial part of the book will be where he argues that if someone could have taken reasonable steps to prevent...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Alberto Mingardi is understandably unimpressed with Mariana Mazzucato’s new book on industrial policy. Here’s a slice from Alberto’s review: Mazzucato’s case for industrial policy suffers from selective history and intellectual hubris. It conveniently refrains from investigating countries like Italy that have prided themselves on enacting such a policy, while placing great faith in “visionary” intellectuals (such as herself) to foresee problems and direct resources toward solutions. Yet...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Juliette Sellgren’s just-released podcast with Wall Street Journal columnist Jason Riley is superb. George Will writes brilliantly about taxation, cronyism, and the duplicity of the political class. A slice: Now comes the pesky question of how to pay for the progressive agenda. Or, more precisely, how to pay the huge price of the minority portion of the agenda’s cost that will be financed by taxes rather than money creation or borrowing. Borrowing means future generations pay, but as has...

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Some Non-Covid Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy is rightly appalled by the blatant lies told by Biden. Eric Boehm reports on yet another of the many reasons already revealed for ditching the hope that Biden will govern from the center. And here’s the Wall Street Journal‘s Editorial Board on the same general topic. A slice: Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders lost the Democratic presidential nomination, but you wouldn’t know from President Biden’s first two months in office....

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Some Non-Covid Links

My colleague Bryan Caplan is multi-talented: He’s now got a clothing line. On the horizon, Gerald Dwyer sees inflation. Here’s his conclusion: The increases in money held by the public are a new experiment to test a widely verified proposition: substantial increases in the quantity of money held by the public are associated with substantial inflation. Inflation is quite likely to be higher in coming years than it has been in the recent past. Whether the increase is muted – an increase of...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Vincent Geloso explains that bigger can be better as long as government stays out of the way. David Henderson reminds us of an important point about welfare economics. Matt Welch reports on the insufferable rent-seeker for many unionized “teachers,” Randi Weingarten. A slice: “We are not convinced that the evidence supports changing physical distancing requirements at this time,” American Federation of Teachers (AFT) President Randi Weingarten declared in a letter Tuesday to Education...

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Some Non-Covid Links

George Will writes about an upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case on the takings clause. Here are his concluding paragraphs: Ratification of the Bill of Rights, including the takings clause, was effective Dec. 15, 1791. Three months later, in a newspaper article on property, James Madison quoted, as the Founders were wont to do, the English jurist William Blackstone, who said the property right means the“dominion which one man claims and exercises over the external things of the world, in...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Writing in the Wall Street Journal, David Neumark – one of the leading researchers on minimum wages – predicts that “raising the minimum wage will definitely cost jobs.” A slice: To provide an accurate reading of the research, Peter Shirley and I surveyed the authors of nearly all U.S. studies estimating the effects of minimum wages on employment published in the past 30 years. We asked them to report to us their best estimate of the employment effect, measured as the “elasticity,” or...

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Some Non-Covid Links

George Will explores a government-school-funding case that the Institute for Justice is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to hear. My Mercatus Center colleague Adam Thierer catalogs some skeptical takes on industrial policy. James Pethokoukis celebrates economic growth. I just discovered Larry Reed’s excellent remembrance of my late, great colleague Walter Williams. A slice: Pursuing truth for its own sake and mustering the courage to speak it without equivocation should be the loftiest of...

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Some Non-Covid Links

My colleague Dan Klein, writing at National Review, defends Adam Smith from the ignorant or lying woke mob. Here’s his conclusion: The same is happening in the United States, of course. Leftists are making quick work of towering figures from our past. But for the sake of our culture and of ourselves, we shouldn’t let them lie about history. University of Tennessee law professor Glenn Reynolds is correct: “To defeat woke tyrants, the rest of us must treat them like the monsters they...

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