Tuesday , June 15 2021
Home / Tag Archives: Debt and Deficits (page 2)

Tag Archives: Debt and Deficits

Some Non-Covid Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy explains that Biden’s environmentally friendly infrastructure plan is good neither for the environment nor for infrastructure. A slice: While the administration is at it, it should end the Merchant Marine Act of 1920. Also known as the Jones Act, this cronyism is a protectionist provision that restricts the waterborne transport of cargo within the United States to vessels that are U.S.-flagged, U.S.-crewed, U.S.-owned and...

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Some Covid Links

I oh-so wish that I could truthfully say that I disagree with what Bob Higgs says in this recent Facebook post. But as with nearly all else that Bob has said over the past 50-plus years, I agree in full: I don’t believe that the rulers have any intention of allowing their subjects to return to the status quo ante regardless of what happens to COVID-19, vaccines, or treatments. The events of the past year have been a godsend for them, and they will fight tooth and nail to resist...

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Some Non-Covid Links

George Will eloquently makes the case against the death penalty. Here’s his conclusion: Capital punishment is ending because of a wholesome squeamishness that reflects (in Chief Justice Earl Warren’s words) society’s “evolving standards of decency.” And because attempts to make it neither cruel nor unusual have made its implementation increasingly capricious, and hence morally absurd. My Mercatus Center colleague Adam Thierer explains that the late Bill Niskanen would be none too pleased...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Art Carden celebrates the 50th birthday of my great, brilliant, and amazingly creative colleague Bryan Caplan. A slice: Poverty: Who’s to Blame? promises to be controversial. As he has argued in lectures he has given on the book’s themes, we can blame third-world governments for lousy policy and first-world governments for immigration restrictions. So far, so good. The most controversial part of the book will be where he argues that if someone could have taken reasonable steps to prevent...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Juliette Sellgren’s just-released podcast with Wall Street Journal columnist Jason Riley is superb. George Will writes brilliantly about taxation, cronyism, and the duplicity of the political class. A slice: Now comes the pesky question of how to pay for the progressive agenda. Or, more precisely, how to pay the huge price of the minority portion of the agenda’s cost that will be financed by taxes rather than money creation or borrowing. Borrowing means future generations pay, but as has...

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Some Non-Covid Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy is rightly appalled by the blatant lies told by Biden. Eric Boehm reports on yet another of the many reasons already revealed for ditching the hope that Biden will govern from the center. And here’s the Wall Street Journal‘s Editorial Board on the same general topic. A slice: Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders lost the Democratic presidential nomination, but you wouldn’t know from President Biden’s first two months in office....

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Some Non-Covid Links

My colleague Bryan Caplan is multi-talented: He’s now got a clothing line. On the horizon, Gerald Dwyer sees inflation. Here’s his conclusion: The increases in money held by the public are a new experiment to test a widely verified proposition: substantial increases in the quantity of money held by the public are associated with substantial inflation. Inflation is quite likely to be higher in coming years than it has been in the recent past. Whether the increase is muted – an increase of...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Vincent Geloso explains that bigger can be better as long as government stays out of the way. David Henderson reminds us of an important point about welfare economics. Matt Welch reports on the insufferable rent-seeker for many unionized “teachers,” Randi Weingarten. A slice: “We are not convinced that the evidence supports changing physical distancing requirements at this time,” American Federation of Teachers (AFT) President Randi Weingarten declared in a letter Tuesday to Education...

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Some Non-Covid Links

George Will writes about an upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case on the takings clause. Here are his concluding paragraphs: Ratification of the Bill of Rights, including the takings clause, was effective Dec. 15, 1791. Three months later, in a newspaper article on property, James Madison quoted, as the Founders were wont to do, the English jurist William Blackstone, who said the property right means the“dominion which one man claims and exercises over the external things of the world, in...

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