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Tag Archives: Economics

Some Non-Covid Links

David Henderson asks if California’s government will raise taxes even more. A slice: To add insult to injury, the bill’s authors say the tax would be imposed “for the privilege of doing business” in California. And here I thought doing business was a right, not a privilege. Silly me. A basic principle in the economics of taxation is that a tax rarely sticks where it lands. Translation: whoever pays the tax almost never bears the whole burden. The payer passes on at least some, and often...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Now available here (by scrolling down) is Ramon DeGennaro’s Liberty Matters essay on my late, great colleague Walter Williams. Wall Street Journal columnist Jason Riley explains Progressives’ need to ignore racial progress. A slice: With the White House struggling to advance its economic agenda, the president’s job-approval rating stuck in the mud, and midterm elections looming, it’s no great shock that Mr. Biden is resorting to racial demagoguery. The Democratic Party has long depended...

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Summer Institute on the History of Economics

I here share, with enthusiasm and my endorsement, an announcement from Duke University economist Bruce Caldwell: The Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University will be hosting another Summer Institute on the History of Economics this summer from June 20-29, 2022. The program is designed for students in graduate programs in economics, though students in graduate school in other fields as well as newly minted PhDs will also be considered. Students will be competitively...

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“Walter E. Williams: One of a Kind”

My Liberty Matters essay on my late, great colleague Walter Williams is now up, and can be found by scrolling down at this link. Two slices: Walter Williams (1936-2020) catapulted into my consciousness in the late 1970s. One afternoon while flipping through the channels – numbering all of five – on my parents’ television set I happened upon television talk-show host Phil Donohue chatting with a guest who made unusually good sense. By then I’d already fallen in love with economics; it was...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Reason‘s Ron Bailey reports that “weather and climate disasters are declining globally.” Simon Cottee is rightly critical of Progressives’ exaggerations of the events of January 6th, 2021. Two slices: It is hard to exaggerate the feverish excitement with which many progressives responded to the Capitol riot. While the spectacle of hundreds of Trump supporters smashing their way into one of the sacrosanct sites of American democracy generated widespread condemnation, for many progressives...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Mike Munger and Terry Anderson remember the late Rick Stroup. A slice: “Rick” Stroup was one of the founders of the environmental economics movement; he was a conservationist of the first rank. “Conserving” resources requires accounting for the opportunity costs of using those resources. But in the 1970s the focus of “environmentalism” was command and control; it fell to economists such as Richard L. Stroup, John A. Baden, Terry L. Anderson, and others to point out that prices embody and...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Nicolás Cachanosky explains why today’s inflation is not chiefly caused by supply-chain web woes. Also writing about inflation is my intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy. The Editorial Board of the Wall Street Journal is unimpressed with the Fed’s current handling of inflation. Here’s the conclusion: Mr. Powell’s strategy seems to be to steer through his confirmation by talking tougher on inflation while doing little about it anytime soon. The Senators can decide if they...

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Pittsburgh Tribune-Review: “Spent theory”

In my column for the September 9th, 2011, edition of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review I explain why I believe Keynesianism to be simplistic and wrongheaded. You can read my column beneath the fold. Spent theory In difficult economic times, simplistic remedies for restoring the economy to health are in ample supply. And no remedy for a slumping economy with high unemployment is more simplistic — and more frequently proposed — than is increased government spending. Higher government spending...

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Pittsburgh Tribune-Review: “Not so simple”

In my column for the July 27th, 2011, edition of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, I argued that “[t]he more complex the economy … the more we must rely upon localized individual decision-makers and less on centralized, collective plans to keep it going and growing.” You can read the full column beneath the fold. Not so simple Harry Truman famously longed for a one-armed economist. Our 33rd president was tired of his economic advisers qualifying their counsel by saying “but on the other...

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