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Tag Archives: Government intervention

Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 534 of George Will’s excellent 2019 book, The Conservative Sensibility: By construing the Constitution in a way that enables and encourages the federal government to act everywhere, we have taught Americans to think that it is natural and right for the federal government to take custody of every problem, to organize the provision of every need, and to satisfy every want. Comments

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Some Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy continues to be appalled by Congress’s irresponsibility. Bryan Caplan learned a lot from Kristian Niemietz’s Socialism: The Failed Idea That Never Dies. Matt Ridley rightly decries the EU’s innovation-stifling bureaucratic risk-aversion. David Henderson supports free trade for reasons economic, ethical, and national security. A slice: In the 18th century, the national security reason for allowing free trade was articulated...

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Pittsburgh Tribune-Review: “Laissez faire is best medicine”

In my Pittsburgh Tribune-Review column of August 22nd, 2007, I argued that the best regimen for an ailing economy is laissez faire. You can read my argument beneath the fold. Laissez faire is best medicine I’m writing these words only days after the Federal Reserve injected several million additional dollars into the economy. The recent steep decline in stock values, apparently sparked by the collapse of the subprime mortgage market, has lots of people plenty worried. They worry not...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 329 of William Leggett’s December 3rd, 1836, Plaindealer essay, “Thanksgiving Day,” as this essay is reprinted and titled in Democratick Editorials, Lawrence H. White, ed. (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1984) (original emphasis): No one can pay the most cursory attention to the state of religion in the United States, without being satisfied that its true interests have been greatly promoted by divorcing it from all connexion with political affairs…. In this city alone [New...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 292 of George Will’s 2019 book, The Conservative Sensibility (original emphasis): New Deal policies were calculated not merely to please or placate existing constituencies but to create many constituencies – labor, retirees, farmers, union members – who would be dependent on the government whose programs summoned them to dependency. Comments

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Another great moment in government overreach and nanny statism – Publications – AEI

AEI Another great moment in government overreach and nanny statism From Lenore Skenazy’s article in Reason “Bureaucrats Consider Shutting Down Informal Play School for 2-Year-Olds Because It’s Too Safe”: Bureaucrats in Washington, D.C. may make it impossible for an informal parent group to meet. For 45 years, parents have brought their two-year-olds to the Lutheran Church of the Reformation as part of a cooperative play school endeavor. It’s a chance to socialize...

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Some Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy busts the myth that family-leave can be engineered to be a free lunch. My Mercatus Center colleague Dan Griswold supplies further thoughts on Dani Rodrik’s critique of “hyperglobalization.” A slice: What’s also missing from Rodrik’s story is how the policy change [to freer trade] came about. If Nicholas loses and John gains from repealing a trade barrier, then doesn’t that mean that at some point in the past it was Nicholas who...

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Bonus Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 297 of my late Nobel-Laureate colleague Jim Buchanan‘s 1976 paper “Public Goods and Natural Liberty,” as this paper is reprinted in James M. Buchanan, Externalities and Public Expenditure Theory (2001), which is volume 15 of The Collected Works of James M. Buchanan: The modern economist may reject [Adam] Smith’s central notion that capital accumulation in a setting of natural liberty protected by law provides the key to economic development, or even that such development...

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The President’s First 100 Days – FDR’s, That Is

Here’s a letter to NPR: Regarding today’s report on the first 100 days of the terms of various U.S. presidents, I dare say that your happy description of Franklin Roosevelt’s is potted (“The ‘First 100 Days’ Presidential Benchmark Goes Back To FDR And Napoleon“).  Writing in 1939 in the Yale Review, John T. Flynn had a different and more realistic take on the start of FDR’s presidency: “It was a hodgepodge of good intentions, of bold promises and glittering hopes – a desire to produce...

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Interventionism Part 1

[Economic Policy: Thoughts for Today and Tomorrow (1979), Lecture 3 (1958)] Reprinted from Mises.org A famous, very often quoted phrase says, “That government is best, which governs least.” I do not believe this to be a correct description of the functions of a good government. Government ought to do all the things for which it is needed and for which it was established. Government ought to protect the individuals within the country against the violent and fraudulent attacks of...

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