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Home / Tag Archives: Hubris and humility

Tag Archives: Hubris and humility

Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 14 of George Will’s 2019 book, The Conservative Sensibility: The empirical case for limited government is that although human beings have something in common – human nature – they are different in capacities and aspirations. From this it follows, not logically but practically, that government cannot hope to provide happiness to all. The most it can reasonably expect to provide are the conditions under which happiness, as each defines it, can be pursued. Comments

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 518 of George Will’s 2019 book, The Conservative Sensibility: Liberalism as originally understood – limited government supervising market societies; government respectful of individual autonomy and individuals’ voluntary transactions – is thin gruel for those with an appetite for red meat politics. As Isaiah Berlin wrote, “A liberal sermon which recommends machinery designed to prevent people from doing each other too much harm, giving each human group sufficient room to...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from Milton Friedman’s September 13th, 1970, essay in the New York Times Magazine – an essay titled “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits“: The discussions of the “social responsibilities of business” are notable for their analytical looseness and lack of rigor. DBx: Reasonable and well-meaning can and do debate, productively, whether or not Friedman was correct or incorrect to argue that managers of for-profit publicly held corporations should not use...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 88 of the 2011 Definitive Edition (Ronald Hamowy, ed.) of F.A. Hayek’s great 1960 book, The Constitution of Liberty: The relevant distinction is not between individual and group action but between conditions, on one hand, in which alternative ways based on different views or practices may be tried and conditions, on the other hand, in which one agency has the exclusive right and the power to prevent others from trying. It is only when such exclusive rights are conferred on...

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Some Links

George Will wisely counsels judicial restraint in interpreting the words of legislation. My GMU Econ colleague Walter Williams argues that government should be blind to race. A slice: Black politicians, civil rights leaders and white liberals have peddled victimhood to black people, teaching them that racism is pervasive and no amount of individual effort can overcome racist barriers. Peddling victimhood is not new. Booker T. Washington said: “There is a class of colored people who make...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 102 of the 2007 Definitive Edition (Bruce Caldwell, ed.) of F.A. Hayek’s classic 1944 volume, The Road to Serfdom: This is the fundamental fact on which the whole philosophy of individualism is based. It does not assume, as is often asserted, that man is egoistic or selfish or ought to be. It merely starts from the indisputable fact that the limits of our powers of imagination make it impossible to include in our scale of values more than a sector of the needs of the whole...

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Some Links

Steve Davies describes what he believes is, today, not a collapse of democracy but realignment. In this short radio interview, my intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy discusses Elizabeth Warren’s scheme for Social Security. Jeff Jacoby wonders why there is no more clamor over the gargantuan and growing indebtedness of the U.S. government. A slice: For the first time since World War II, the government’s debt ($22.02 trillion) is bigger than America’s entire economy ($21.06...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 295 of Thomas Sowell’s 2009 book Intellectuals and Society: By encouraging or even requiring students to take stands when they have neither the knowledge nor the intellectual training to seriously examine complex issues, teachers promote the expression of unsubstantiated opinions, the venting of uninformed emotions, and the habit of acting on those opinions and emotions while ignoring or dismissing opposing views, without having either the intellectual equipment or the...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page xxv of George Will’s 2019 book, The Conservative Sensibility: The progressives’ indictment is that the [American] Founders’ politics is cramped and uninspiring because it neither aspires to, nor allows for, the integration of the individual’s spiritual needs and yearnings with the individual’s political identity and activities. To this indictment the American conservative’s proper response is a cheerful, proud plea of guilty. The world has suffered much, and still suffers,...

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Some Links

Michael Strain offers some reason to believe that today’s populism will soon be back beneath the rock from where slithered. Matt Welch reviews Samantha Power’s The Education of an Idealist. (HT David Henderson) Kevin Williamson exposes the astonishing ignorance of New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie. A slice: Bouie’s majoritarian ideology is nowhere to be found in the Constitution; in fact, the very structure of American government is designed to frustrate that kind of crass...

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