Friday , October 30 2020
Home / Tag Archives: Labor Mobility, Immigration, Outsourcing

Tag Archives: Labor Mobility, Immigration, Outsourcing

Three Economists Walk Into a Discussion, Part 2

Last week I posted Part 1 of my observations on the discussion between Kevin Hassett and Austan Goolsbee. This is Part 2. I left with the issue of the federal deficit and debt. 35:30: Goolsbee doesn’t think we’ll be Greece. We have low income tax rates, no VAT, and better demographics. He argues that tax rates on grandkids will need to he higher. He thinks we need immigration to offset the aging of the population. DRH comment: I’m disappointed that neither Hassett...

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My All-New “Economics of Immigration” Course

In three weeks, I premiere my all-new course on the “Economics of Immigration.”  If GMU sticks to its current plan, I will start teaching it in-person on August 27 to a mixed class of grad students and undergrads.  As you’d expect, the class closely follows the organization of Open Borders: The Science and Ethics of Immigration, but with extra time devoted to criticism of immigration from social scientists like George Borjas, Paul Collier, and Garett Jones.  The...

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The Diversity Lottery: Some Rough Open Borders Arithmetic

How many people want to immigrate to the U.S.?  In my past work, I’ve appealed to both surveys and black market prices to ballpark the answer.  Another approach, however, is to take a look at the U.S. Diversity lottery.  Every year, the U.S. takes applications from would-be immigrants all over the world.  Countries like Mexico, China, and India that already send lots of immigrants to the U.S. are excluded.  Further requirements: If selected, to qualify for the...

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Who Gets In?

I’ve studied immigration for years, but now that I’m prepping an Economics of Immigration class for the fall, I’ve been learning some new facts. Today’s question: Who actually gets into the U.S. legally?  Here’s what I found in the latest Yearbook of Immigration Statistics. I’ve long known that family reunification is the heart of U.S. immigration policy, but I didn’t realize the extremity of the pattern.  In 2018, 44% of visas went to immediate relatives of U.S....

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Krikorian’s “Category Error”

During our last debate, an audience member asked Mark Krikorian if his arguments for restricting immigration of foreigners were also arguments for restricting the child-bearing of natives.  You might think that Mark would insist that native babies are somehow better than foreign adults.  How hard could it possibly be to craft such an argument?  However, Mark adamantly refused to compare the worths of different kinds of people.  Instead, he informed the questioner that...

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The Supreme Court is a follower, not a leader

Both progressives and conservatives obsess about who is appointed to the Supreme Court, as if political ideology determines whether someone is a highly qualified judge. Or perhaps it is because they believe their preferred justices will produce a better set of public policies.  In fact, the hope of remaking the Court to fit one’s ideology remains a mirage, always hovering just over the horizon.  Here’s Janan Ganesh of the FT: Whoever was “right”, the evidence that...

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Best Recent Paragraph on Immigration Hassles

(An aside: when describing the above, regular, non-emigrant citizens in the US never have the slightest familiarity with what I’m talking about. These indignities are instantly familiar to even the fanciest of us developed-world middle-class immigrants, but a perpetual surprise to citizens. If they have that little insight, you’ll probably grok why they can’t understand a Honduran lad with three socks and one shoe who’s running from a civil war.) This is from James...

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Does Restricting Immigration Necessarily Reduce Unemployment?

Skilled Immigrants Helped Saved our Butts. Does restricting immigration necessarily reduce unemployment? In the long run, it doesn’t, as there is an infinite amount of work to be done. If you doubt that, think of another group that entered the labor force, a group that, from 1950 to 2000, was a more important entrant over that time than immigrants. The group is women. In 1950, there were 43.8 million men in the U.S. labor force and 18.4 million women. By 2000, there...

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Immigration vs. Social Desirability Bias

Consider the following specimens of Social Desirability Bias. 1. This is my country, I would never want to live anywhere else. 2. Patriotism matters more than money! 3. I couldn’t bear the thought of my children not growing up as citizens of [my country of birth]. 4. This is the greatest country in the world. 5. Nothing is more important than keeping our whole family together. 6. We’re nothing without our traditions. 7. Our identity matters more than gold. 8. We’ve...

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AEA Hides Its Racist Past

I posted on Thursday about the fact that the officers and governance committees of the American Economic Association don’t know much about the literature on the economics and discrimination. In their statement, they wrote: We recognize that we have only begun to understand racism and its impact on our profession and our discipline. I had thought at the time that they were simply ignorant of the literature. But it may be worse. Commenter Richard Ebeling pointed out...

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