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Home / Tag Archives: Labor Mobility, Immigration, Outsourcing

Tag Archives: Labor Mobility, Immigration, Outsourcing

Unions Exist to Look After Their Members, Baseball edition

Baseball is back, but it was in doubt for a while. It was only on March 13 that the second longest work stoppage in baseball history – 99 days – came to an end when the MLB and the MLB Players’ Association – the baseball players’ union – struck a deal. The Players Association was pushing for a number of things. One was more money: they wanted the Competitive Balance Tax – which is effectively an upper limit on spending – raised. They were also resisting the...

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Cecilia Rouse on Biden Economic Policy, Part II

Yesterday I posted on the Zoom talk that Biden CEA chair Cecilia Rouse gave to a Stanford audience last Thursday. Here’s Part II. Part III will come tomorrow. 11:40: Rouse notes the dramatic drop in compensation in the labor market from February 2020 to April 2020, “when we asked everybody to go home.” Not quite accurate. There wasn’t a lot of “asking” going on. It was mainly telling. While I found Rouse to be someone I would find very likeable if I met her, I see...

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Sanctions and Asylum

According to Richard Hanania, trade sanctions are “ineffective, immoral, and politically convenient”: Sanctions have massive humanitarian costs and are not only ineffective but likely counterproductive. On these points, there is overwhelming agreement in the academic literature. Such policies can reduce the economic performance of the targeted state, degrade public health, and cause tens of thousands of deaths per year under the most crushing sanctions regimes....

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Does immigration reduce wages?

Critics of immigration often point to the fact that the post-WWII decades were a sort of golden age for American workers, with rapid growth in real wages up until about 1973. They argue that the immigration changes of the 1960s opened the floodgates, leading to much higher rates of immigration and lower wage gains for workers.Some people argue that it’s simply a question of supply and demand—more supply of workers means lower wages. Economists often reply that more...

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Covid Migration: Why the Asymmetry?

During Covid, the U.S. reverted to our old tradition of federalism – and then embraced gubernatorial dictatorship.  As  result of this strange and shocking institutional revolution, the U.S. witnessed a dramatic rise in policy variance.  Some parts of the U.S., like Florida and Texas, returned to near-normalcy in a matter of months.  Others, like California and New York, became and remain soft police states. We’ve now spent the better part of two years arguing about...

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Enright on Caplan on Immigration, Part Trois

I’ve posted twice now (here and here) on Sam Enright’s critique of my co-blogger Bryan Caplan’s case for open borders. I have two more points, one where I agree with an Enright critique and one where I disagree with an Enright compliment of Bryan. The critique I agree with is that Bryan’s analysis is too America-centric. This is what Bryan knows and this, plus Canadian immigration policy, is what I know. Together those two countries could easily take a few hundred...

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Sam Enright Responds

On Tuesday, October 26, I posted on what I saw as a particularly weak argument that Sam Enright used against open borders. He argued that open borders would substantially raise incomes of immigrants from poor to rich countries [true] and that this would increase the demand for products of factor farming [almost certainly true.] I pointed out that if we accept this argument for restricting immigration, then, if reducing Americans’ real income substantially reduced the...

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Enright on Caplan on Immigration

Sam Enright has written a good review of Bryan Caplan’s Open Borders: The Science and Ethics of Immigration. I like it for two main reasons: (1) he takes Bryan completely seriously and doesn’t take cheap shots, and, related to that, (2) the tone is quite nice. I do have a number of criticisms, but I’ve been thinking about one main one. Enright writes: I’m also concerned about the animal suffering that would result from open borders. Globally, the production of meat,...

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What kind of immigrants does the GOP want?

In recent years, I’ve seen many conservatives argue against illegal immigration, warning darkly of our society being polluted by “rapists and murderers”, despite the fact that immigrants have a lower crime rate than native born Americans. They also seem to worry about the fact that immigrants come from different cultures. This has always struck me as odd, because one of American’s most distinctive features is that for hundreds of years there have been lots of whites,...

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An unsung success story

As a candidate, Donald Trump promised to ban Muslim travel to the US.  After being rebuffed by the courts, President Trump had to settle for a watered down ban on travel from a subset of Muslim countries.  Nonetheless, the US Muslim population continues to grow rapidly, and has achieved a great deal of economic success as well.  Here is The Economist: The past 20 years have mostly been golden for America’s Muslims. The community has more than doubled in size, to 3.5m....

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