Friday , September 17 2021
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Tag Archives: Philosophy of Freedom

Bonus Quotation of the Day…

… is from George Will’s latest column, titled by the Washington Post “Presidential impatience with covid doesn’t excuse wielding extra-constitutional power“; this passage from Will is prompted in part by a remark made recently on CNN by the authoritarian, and appallingly uninformed, Leana Wen: The word “travel” is not in the Constitution. Neither is the word “bacon,” but we have a right to have bacon for breakfast, and to raise our children. This puzzles people who think rights are...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 287 of Tom Palmer’s December 31st, 1999, Human Events essay titled “The Millennial Struggle for Liberty,” as this essay is reprinted in Tom’s excellent 2009 book, Realizing Freedom: The most important development of the past thousand years has been the growth of liberty, both because liberty is important in its own right and because it is what has made virtually all of the other achievements of humanity possible, as well, from science to art to material well being. ...

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Bonus Quotation of the Day…

… is from Deirdre McCloskey’s June 2021 review of Pete Boettke’s 2021 book The Struggle for a Better World: Good behavior is achieved, actually, not by rules or catechisms or snappy if self-contradictory 18th-century formulas like the categorical imperative or the greatest happiness or the greatest number, but rather, as the ancients in Greece and China and everywhere else said, by forming one’s character well, and then acting in accordance with it. DBx: Today – September 11th – is...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 61 of the late M. Stanton Evans’s 1976 Hillsdale College address, “The Liberal Twilight,” as it appears in Champions of Freedom (Vol. 3, 1976): If one adopts the authoritarian premises, ultimately one is going to emerge with the authoritarian conclusions. The libertarian shell has fallen away, and we’re left with the bedrock principles of compulsion and the subjection of human beings to a planning elite.

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 370 of Michael Oakeshott’s 1961 essay “The Masses in Representative Democracy,” as this essay is reprinted the 1991 Liberty Fund collection of some of Oakeshott’s work, Rationalism in Politics and Other Essays: Human individuality is an historical emergence, as ‘artificial’ and as ‘natural’ as the landscape. In modern Europe this emergence was gradual, and the specific character of the individual who emerged was determined by the manner of his generation. He became...

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Are You a Racist?

John Stossel, in this video featuring John McWhorter, exposes many of the inane presumptions – indeed, the mindless religious fundamentalism – of the intellectually and ethically comatose ‘woke’ crowd.

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from pages 144-145 of the late Shirley Robin Letwin’s 1976 Hillsdale College address, “The Morality of the Free Man,” as it appears in Champions of Freedom (Vol. 3, 1976); here, Letwin means by “gentleman” anyone who is guided in his or her personal conduct and outlook by what Deirdre McCloskey describes as the bourgeois virtues: The second, and to some the most surprising, of the gentleman’s virtues is his diffidence. It is not like the more traditional virtue of humility because...

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Bonus Quotation of the Day…

… is from Thomas Jefferson’s letter of April 24th, 1816, to Pierre S. DuPont de Nemours: [T]he majority, oppressing an individual, is guilty of a crime, abuses its strength, and by acting on the law of the strongest breaks up the foundations of society.

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Some Non-Covid Links

Samuel Gregg continues to write informatively about the fantasy that is industrial policy. A slice: There is, however, a wealth of evidence indicating that these policies produced similarly pedestrian outcomes in these countries. As for the Tigers, what primarily took them from the status of economic backwaters to first-world economies was economic liberalization and especially trade openness—not experts with great confidence in their own ability to foresee and generate specific economic...

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