Friday , January 21 2022
Home / Tag Archives: Philosophy of Freedom

Tag Archives: Philosophy of Freedom

Some Non-Covid Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy continues her on-going effort to expose the shenanigans and power-lust of that great geyser of cronyism, the U.S. Export-Import Bank. Phil Magness, in a piece that originally appeared in National Review, eviscerates the take of practitioners of the so-called “New History of Capitalism” on the connection between slavery and capitalism. Two slices: The NHC came under intense fire from other experts, and not only for its...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Now available here (by scrolling down) is Ramon DeGennaro’s Liberty Matters essay on my late, great colleague Walter Williams. Wall Street Journal columnist Jason Riley explains Progressives’ need to ignore racial progress. A slice: With the White House struggling to advance its economic agenda, the president’s job-approval rating stuck in the mud, and midterm elections looming, it’s no great shock that Mr. Biden is resorting to racial demagoguery. The Democratic Party has long depended...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Pierre Lemieux ably defends his claim that wokism and fascism “are not so different anyway.” Samuel Gregg looks back 80 years ago to the publication of Wilhelm Röpke’s Die Gesellschaftskrisis der Gegenwart (The Social Crisis of Our Time). A slice: That rationalism went hand-in-hand with another 19th-century phenomenon: that being the steady concentration of state power. Monarchical absolutism may have been on its way out, but Röpke believed that power had in other respects become more...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Arnold Kling wisely reviews Jonathan Rauch’s new book, The Constitution of Knowledge. A slice: If Rauch has a blind spot, it is that he overlooks the deterioration that has taken place within twentieth-century institutions. He is unable or unwilling to recognize institutional decay. As one trivial example, Rauch quotes Lisa Page in one place and Peter Strzok elsewhere to buttress minor points. Rauch refers to each only as “a former FBI agent.” In fact, they were infamously lovers who...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 314 of my favorite of all of Richard Epstein’s many excellent books, his 1995 volume, Simple Rules for a Complex World: No one wishes to deny that parents are capable of miseducating their own children. But to the extent that all parents can control only the education of their own children, we can avoid the greatest peril of social life, the nondiversification of political risk, which occurs when any central agency is allowed and determined to set the agenda for the system...

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“Walter E. Williams: One of a Kind”

My Liberty Matters essay on my late, great colleague Walter Williams is now up, and can be found by scrolling down at this link. Two slices: Walter Williams (1936-2020) catapulted into my consciousness in the late 1970s. One afternoon while flipping through the channels – numbering all of five – on my parents’ television set I happened upon television talk-show host Phil Donohue chatting with a guest who made unusually good sense. By then I’d already fallen in love with economics; it was...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 154 of F.A. Hayek’s profound 1952 book The Counter-Revolution of Science, as this book appears as part of volume 13 (Studies on the Abuse & Decline of Reason, Bruce Caldwell, ed. [2010]) of the Collected Works of F.A. Hayek: It may indeed prove to be far the most difficult and not the least important task for human reason to comprehend its own limitations.

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Harold Black Remembers Walter Williams

This month’s Liberty Matters episode is devoted to the work and legacy of my late, great colleague and dear friend Walter Williams. The first essay is by Professor Harold Black. Other essays, including one by me, will appear within the next few days. Here’s a slice from Professor Black’s essay (footnotes deleted): Williams was a fierce advocate of limited government and opponent of forced income redistribution. He famously stated, “Let me offer you my definition of social justice: I keep...

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Some Covid Links

“Children forced to Zoom into school ended up with suboptimal immune systems—the opposite of herd immunity” – so reports Pamela Hobart. A slice: By May and June 2021, pediatricians noticed an unprecedented, counterseasonal surge in communicable illnesses, particularly RSV. Hand, foot, and mouth disease came right along with it, tearing through schools and day care centers all summer with unmistakable boils. Strep throat got in on the action too. Instead of dodging diseases, this catch-up...

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