Monday , September 23 2019
Home / Tag Archives: Philosophy of Freedom

Tag Archives: Philosophy of Freedom

Quotation of the Day…

… is from page xxv of George Will’s 2019 book, The Conservative Sensibility: The progressives’ indictment is that the [American] Founders’ politics is cramped and uninspiring because it neither aspires to, nor allows for, the integration of the individual’s spiritual needs and yearnings with the individual’s political identity and activities. To this indictment the American conservative’s proper response is a cheerful, proud plea of guilty. The world has suffered much, and still suffers,...

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My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy describes new “reforms” at that great geyser of cronyism, the U.S. Export-Import Bank, as “little more than window dressing that would not substantially change Ex-Im’s dodgy portfolio.” David Henderson takes stock of supply-side economics. Phil Magness reports on the not-so-sweet history of Swedish statism. My GMU Econ colleague Bryan Caplan is indeed wise. In this podcast, Aaron Powell and Trevor Burrus talk with the grateful Steve...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 346 of the 1990 Transaction Publishers reprint of W.H. Hutt’s 1936 volume, Economists and the Public: And it is when demand is impartial, when purchasers are completely ignorant or indifferent to the status (e.g. rank, age, sex, race, nationality or religion) of producers, and when other institutions do not protect status, that this tendency to equality finds realization. DBx: Occupational-licensing requirements, subsidies (such as those doled out through the U.S....

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Bonus Quotation of the Day…

… is offered to commemorate Constitution Day in the United States, which is September 17th; this quotation is from page 65 of Liberty Fund’s 1980 edition of James Fenimore Cooper’s 1838 The American Democrat: Although it is true, that no genuine liberty can exist without being based on popular authority in the last resort, it is equally true that it can not exist when thus based, without many restraints on the powers of the mass. These restraints are necessarily various and numerous....

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Max Gulker argues that a President Elizabeth Warren would be an even greater calamity than would a President Bernie Sanders. A slice: Warren presents herself as a tireless, technocratic savior of capitalism, but her plans give the U.S. government far more control over individual firms, households, and markets than anything proposed in recent memory. Warren, a legal scholar by trade, has moved into the complex realm of a modern economy, where a lawyer’s penchant for sweating the details...

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Quotation of the Day…

.. is the closing paragraph of Tom Palmer’s 2002 essay “Classical Liberalism and Civil Society”; it appears on page 246 of Tom’s 2009 book, Realizing Freedom: Classical liberals insist that, under normal circumstances, at least, the liberty of the individual human being is the highest political end. It is not the end or goal of life itself, but the condition that makes the ends of life most likely to be attained. DBx: Your ability to achieve your individual ends – many of which, by the...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from pages 338-339 of George Will’s 2019 book, The Conservative Sensibility: The more that individualism can be portrayed as a chimera, the more that any individual’s achievement can be considered derivative from society, the less the achievements warrant respect. And the more society is entitled to conscript – that is, to socialize – whatever portion of the individual’s wealth that it considers its fair share. Society may, as an optional act of political grace, allow the individual...

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My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy, writing with Jack Salmon, rightly criticizes popular proposals to further subsidize higher education. Kai Weiss eloquently exposes the fatal conceit of Mary Eberstadt, J.D. Vance, and other “national conservatives.” A slice: As Steven Horwitz writes in another reply to Vance over at EconLib, simply because Vance thinks government should solve all of the crises he has diagnosed, does not mean it would be successful in it. In fact,...

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Order your copies now of Deirdre McCloskey’s Why Liberalism Works – it’ll be available next month. I’ve read it and it’s marvelous. Shikha Dalmia is rightfully distressed – and mystified – that so many Democrats are as bad as, or even worse, than Trump on trade. A slice: The Peterson Institute for International Economics has estimated that expansion of free trade has generated $2.1 trillion for America between 1950 and 2016. That works out on average to $18,000 in income for American...

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My former GMU colleague – now the holder of the Hugh H. Macaulay Chair in Economics at Clemson University – Tom Hazlett brilliantly exposes the many intellectual fallacies that fuel “hipster antitrust.” A slice: Every business acquires inputs and then sells outputs. In between, some magical process creates new value. Cooperative deals between suppliers and buyers today may well erupt in rivalrous tension tomorrow. That’s actually a good thing: We want to encourage shifting alliances....

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