Thursday , June 17 2021
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Tag Archives: Podcast

Some Non-Covid Links

GMU Econ alum Dan Mitchell reminds us that “by historical standards, today’s Americans are fantastically wealthy.” My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy talks with Emily Jashinsky about some of Biden’s irresponsible policies. Also from Vero is this EconLog blog post on Covid and Keynesian stimulus. Here’s her conclusion: I am not expecting newspapers to stop calling government spending “stimulus”, but it would be nice if textbooks would adjust their Keynesian theory...

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Some Non-Covid Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy reports on a truly loathsome attitude that government bailouts of airlines have instilled in at least some airline executives. My colleague Bryan Caplan is correct that discrimination should be deregulated. Here’s Arnold Kling on discourse in modern economics. Writing in the Wall Street Journal, Pat Garofalo and my old friend Mike LaFaive make the case against subsidies to movie producers. A slice: Moviemakers play states against...

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Some Covid Links

David Thunder writes that “governments need to stop playing God.” A slice: But social life is not a luxury that we can just suspend for a higher cause — it is the way we meet our most basic physical, spiritual and emotional needs. People will do what it takes to meet these needs, no matter what public officials decree. People will keep needing to be cared for, fed, nurtured, consoled and attended to by other human beings – and people will not tolerate social isolation forever, no matter...

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Some Non-Covid Links

GMU Econ student Dominic Pino – writing at National Review‘s “The Corner” – calls on the GOP to find the backbone necessary to oppose wasteful spending on infrastructure. A slice: We know what blanket infrastructure spending looks like. When the federal government is just throwing money at the states for projects they don’t really need, there’s not going to be any urgency to spend the money in a way that benefits taxpayers. Juliette Sellgren talks with Reason‘s Nick Gillespie. Phil...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Wall Street Journal columnist Jason Riley praises some books – including one by Phil Magness – pushing back against the idiotic “1619 Project.” A slice: Mr. Magness’s book examines the 1619 Project’s assertion that slave labor powered the U.S. economy, an argument that rests on “dubious statistical claims and shoddy research practices,” which have been refuted empirically in peer-reviewed journals. “The thrust of these exaggerations is to recast slavery as a distinctly capitalist...

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Some Non-Covid Links

Eric Boehm reports that “American consumers are bearing nearly 93 percent of the costs of the tariffs applied to Chinese goods, according to Moody’s Investors Service.” A slice: Prior to 2018, the average American tariff on imports from China was just 3.1 percent, according to data from the Peterson Institute for International Economics. But after Trump hiked tariffs on a wide range of imports covering everything from industrial goods to toys, the average tariff on imports from China is...

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Some Non-Covid Links

George Will decries “Biden’s policy to use less affluent Americans’ money to entice more affluent Americans to buy EVs is only one of the contemplated regressive policies by which his administration would transfer wealth upward.” Bjorn Lomborg decries environmentalists’ attempt to use the courts to impose policies that are proving to be unachievable in legislatures. A slice: This is because strong climate policy is enormously expensive and delivers minuscule climate benefits. President...

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Some Covid Links

Purdue University president Mitch Daniels delivered stirring remarks to that school’s graduating class of 2021. A slice: This last year, many of your elders failed this fundamental test of leadership. They let their understandable human fear of uncertainty overcome their duty to balance all the interests for which they were responsible. They hid behind the advice of experts in one field but ignored the warnings of experts in other realms that they might do harm beyond the good they hoped...

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Some Covid Links

Peter Earle details some of the damage wrought by Covid Derangement Syndrome. Those of you who dismiss those of us who insist that Covid Derangement Syndrome is both real and readily available as an excuse for the exercise of arbitrary state power might wish to ponder this report from CBS News. (HT Phil Magness). Here’s the sensational headline: “DHS warns violent extremists may exploit easing of COVID restrictions to plan new attacks” – a headline that can, without any loss of...

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Some Links

Steven Greenhut rightly warns of the noxious notions of “nationalist conservatives.” Here’s his conclusion: This is just a grandiose justification for government intervention in private decisions. What is the common good? It is whatever policy makers and government planners say it is. This proposal sounds remarkably similar to the progressive vision of letting “public-spirited” bureaucrats and politicians have unlimited power. They know what’s best, after all. Despite their common-good...

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