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Tag Archives: Regulation

Void if vague

Void for vagueness Definition 1) In criminal law, a declaration that a law is invalid because it is not sufficiently clear.  Laws are usually found void for vagueness if, after setting some requirement or punishment, the law does not specify what is required or what conduct is punishable.  For more information, see vagueness doctrine. 2) Under vagueness doctrine, a statute is also void for vagueness if a legislature’s delegation of authority to judges and/or administrators is so extensive...

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Pollsters are people too

This poll caught my eye: This shows everything that is wrong with polling.  I wouldn’t even know how to answer the second question, because I don’t see what they are asking.  Required by whom?  Should there be a law requiring that everyone be vaccinated before boarding an airplane?  Of course not.  Should airlines require vaccination?  That’s up to them, but it certainly makes more sense than requiring that people take off their shoes before boarding, or that they...

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How Scientific is the FDA?

Not as much as  you might think. The Food and Drug Administration claims to follow the science. So why is it attacking ivermectin, a medication it certified in 1996? Earlier this year the agency put out a special warning that “you should not use ivermectin to treat or prevent COVID-19.” The FDA’s statement included words and phrases such as “serious harm,” “hospitalized,” “dangerous,” “very dangerous,” “seizures,” “coma and even death” and “highly toxic.” Any reader...

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EconVersation with Dan Sutter of Troy University

Dan Sutter, an economist who heads the Manuel Johnson Center for Political Economy at Troy University, interviewed me in June about my recent article in Reason titled “Economic Lessons from COVID-19,” Reason, June 2021. The 30-minute interview is up. Some highlights: 3:00: How incentives matter. 5:25: Extra federal unemployment benefits and a free summer vacation. 8:00: Opportunities for teenagers. 8:50: Mises, Hayek, and the socialist calculation debate. 9:50:...

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What’s Wrong with Registering Women for the Draft?

The National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service issued a report in March recommending that Congress “eliminate male-only registration and expand draft eligibility to all individuals of the appropriate age cohort,” because “expanding draft eligibility to women will enable the military to access the most qualified individuals, regardless of sex.” Women have been eligible to occupy all combat roles since 2015. This is from Ella Lubell, “Senate...

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Some Non-Covid Links

I’m no specialist in monetary economics, but everything that I know about economics tells me that Arnold Kling is correct to predict the coming of not insignificant inflation. Arnold Kling is also correct, I believe, to argue that the ‘gradualist’ school of economic growth – those economic historians who deny the historical reality of an industrial revolution – are mistaken. (DBx: But this growth was sparked by more than trade and specialization according to comparative advantage. As...

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Freedom is Regulation, Florida Edition

A spokeswoman for the Florida governor’s office said Norwegian’s stance discriminated against children and individuals who can’t be vaccinated, and noted the state’s legal efforts against the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s sailing restrictions and protocols. “Apparently Norwegian prefers the shackles of the CDC to the freedom offered by Florida,” the spokeswoman said in a statement. “This administration will not tolerate such widespread...

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Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 279 of my late Nobel-laureate colleague James Buchanan’s 1976 paper “Public Goods and Natural Liberty,” which is chapter 9 in the 1976 collection The Market and the State: Essays in Honour of Adam Smith (Thomas Wilson and Andrew S. Skinner, eds.) – a collection of original papers delivered at the University of Glasgow, in April 1976, on the bicentenary of the publication of Adam Smith’s magnificent An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations: The...

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Biden’s Executive Order on Competition

Recently the Wall Street Journal stated that President Biden’s July 9 executive order on competition is a “sweeping proposal to spur competition.” That raises an important question: how can a government spur competition? Economics has a lot to say about that question. The major way, which goes back to Adam Smith, is to get rid of barriers that government itself uses to block or limit competition. While the Biden executive order does mention one government barrier to...

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Some Non-Covid Links

GMU Law professor Joshua Wright is right, in this letter to the Wall Street Journal, about the FTC: It’s a touch ominous when a bureaucrat begins her tenure by sending bipartisan procedural safeguards to the paper shredder. Federal Trade Commission Chairman Lina Khan wasted no time making confetti of the guardrails at the FTC, including the Obama administration policy statement placing minimal limits on how the agency could use its theretofore undefined power to police “unfair methods of...

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