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Tag Archives: Regulation

Quotation of the Day…

… is from page 172 of my late Nobel-laureate colleague Jim Buchanan’s 1987 paper “Man and the State,” as this paper is reprinted in James M. Buchanan, Federalism, Liberty, and Law (2001), which is volume 18 of the Collected Works of James M. Buchanan: Failure or success has too often been measured in terms of the standard economists’ criterion of efficiency, the ability to get goods and services produced and distributed, to add to the wealth of nations. Markets may fail against the...

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Some Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy gives credit where credit is due – in this case to the Trump administration for its wise roll-back of an Obama-era labor policy John O. McGinnis exposes the appalling ideology and bias of the New York Times. Have you ever heard of the genuine hero Wilson Greatbatch? Stuart Anderson gets the language right about travel bans. Kevin Williamson has fun revealing the Everestian economic ignorance now on the loose in Sacramento. Here’s a...

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Some Links

Russ Roberts is interviewed on the many pitfalls of measuring economic change. A slice: Q: Is there a more accurate way to measure wealth in 1975 vs. today? A: A recent study found the bottom half of the income distribution today makes the same on average as the bottom half 35 or 40 years ago. That’s extraordinarily depressing, if true. It implies the top is just doing way too well. But a handful of studies have instead taken people in 1975 and followed them through time to see if the...

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Which contentious issues are not partisan?

With America’s politics being increasingly polarized, it’s worth giving some thought to the issues are not partisan. What makes an issue cross party lines?  In San Diego, a proposal to limit growth has split the Democratic party: “The ‘Yes on A’ side was unable to address the racial problem, in a way that clearly made our African-American voting members very uncomfortable,” he said. “Some language in the initiative seemed coded, things like defending neighborhood...

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Identity cards also have costs

The Economist has an article that focuses on the benefits of giving each citizen an identity card: Around the world, about one billion people lack official proof of their identities, reckons the World Bank. Such citizens cannot, in many cases, get services such as health care, welfare and education. They also struggle to exercise their rights to vote or live in their home countries. States need this information, too. Without it, governments have no idea whom to tax,...

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The Trump Regulatory Record

Before Thanksgiving, a business reporter contacted me for an article he was writing on discussion points for families that wanted to talk politics around the holiday table. He asked me specifically to write up some thoughts about the Trump administration’s regulatory policies, and I did. He ended up not using them, even though I thought they were pretty provocative; in essence, I argued the Trump regulatory record was much less significant than what both the...

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Some Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy exposes an atrocious shake-down operation run by the U.S. Department of Labor. I’m very glad that John Tamny responded to Michael Lind’s weak recent essay in the Wall Street Journal. A slice: Except that what’s really “snobbish” is the belief that workers shouldn’t “move to opportunity.” It’s snobblish because it insults the very people who made the U.S. great by risking everything (including their lives) on the way to crossing...

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Some Links

Bryan Riley exposes many of the errors that mar Peter Navarro’s most-recent lame attempt to justify Trump’s tariffs punitive taxes on Americans who buy imports. Jacob Sullum rightly praises members of Congress who resist the grab of unilateral war-making powers by the president of the executive branch of the national government. Who does occupational licensing hurt the most? Russ Roberts blogs on gratitude, kindness, and loveliness. Vincent Geloso and Alex Salter write about state...

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Pittsburgh Tribune-Review: “Sweet Land of Liberty?”

In my Pittsburgh Tribune-Review column of December 14th, 2007, I lamented the fact that we Americans do not take seriously enough our boast of living in a sweet land of liberty. You can read my lamentation beneath the fold. Sweet Land of Liberty? In this sweet land of liberty it is surprising how readily we modern Americans let others rule us. I’m not talking about Americans letting some foreign government rule us. That won’t happen anytime soon. There’s no risk that, say, we will...

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Some Links

Richard Ebeling expresses his objections to Tyler Cowen’s “state-capacity libertarianism.” A slice: Why do so many people accept the notion that imposing and raising legal minimum wages are good for people at the lower income levels? Do they have some inexplicable “propensity” to demand higher wages for others through government mandate as their own economic circumstances improve? I think the more reasonable explanation is a failure to understand and appreciate all the implications of...

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