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Tag Archives: Regulation

Which contentious issues are not partisan?

With America’s politics being increasingly polarized, it’s worth giving some thought to the issues are not partisan. What makes an issue cross party lines?  In San Diego, a proposal to limit growth has split the Democratic party: “The ‘Yes on A’ side was unable to address the racial problem, in a way that clearly made our African-American voting members very uncomfortable,” he said. “Some language in the initiative seemed coded, things like defending neighborhood...

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Identity cards also have costs

The Economist has an article that focuses on the benefits of giving each citizen an identity card: Around the world, about one billion people lack official proof of their identities, reckons the World Bank. Such citizens cannot, in many cases, get services such as health care, welfare and education. They also struggle to exercise their rights to vote or live in their home countries. States need this information, too. Without it, governments have no idea whom to tax,...

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The Trump Regulatory Record

Before Thanksgiving, a business reporter contacted me for an article he was writing on discussion points for families that wanted to talk politics around the holiday table. He asked me specifically to write up some thoughts about the Trump administration’s regulatory policies, and I did. He ended up not using them, even though I thought they were pretty provocative; in essence, I argued the Trump regulatory record was much less significant than what both the...

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Some Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy exposes an atrocious shake-down operation run by the U.S. Department of Labor. I’m very glad that John Tamny responded to Michael Lind’s weak recent essay in the Wall Street Journal. A slice: Except that what’s really “snobbish” is the belief that workers shouldn’t “move to opportunity.” It’s snobblish because it insults the very people who made the U.S. great by risking everything (including their lives) on the way to crossing...

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Some Links

Bryan Riley exposes many of the errors that mar Peter Navarro’s most-recent lame attempt to justify Trump’s tariffs punitive taxes on Americans who buy imports. Jacob Sullum rightly praises members of Congress who resist the grab of unilateral war-making powers by the president of the executive branch of the national government. Who does occupational licensing hurt the most? Russ Roberts blogs on gratitude, kindness, and loveliness. Vincent Geloso and Alex Salter write about state...

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Pittsburgh Tribune-Review: “Sweet Land of Liberty?”

In my Pittsburgh Tribune-Review column of December 14th, 2007, I lamented the fact that we Americans do not take seriously enough our boast of living in a sweet land of liberty. You can read my lamentation beneath the fold. Sweet Land of Liberty? In this sweet land of liberty it is surprising how readily we modern Americans let others rule us. I’m not talking about Americans letting some foreign government rule us. That won’t happen anytime soon. There’s no risk that, say, we will...

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Some Links

Richard Ebeling expresses his objections to Tyler Cowen’s “state-capacity libertarianism.” A slice: Why do so many people accept the notion that imposing and raising legal minimum wages are good for people at the lower income levels? Do they have some inexplicable “propensity” to demand higher wages for others through government mandate as their own economic circumstances improve? I think the more reasonable explanation is a failure to understand and appreciate all the implications of...

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Do big cities help economic growth?

In recent decades, bigger cities have tended to do better than small towns and rural areas. But that doesn’t necessarily imply that big cities have more pro-growth economic policies, indeed one can make an argument that the opposite is true. Tyler Cowen linked to a Washington Post article that discussed the reasons why the DC suburbs in northern Virginia are growing faster than the suburbs in Maryland: The overall business climate has also played a role. In general,...

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Make Toilets Great Again

Back in September, I attended a round table where the guest was a major economic advisor to Donald Trump and the participants were economists and other public policy people. I can’t be more specific because of the Chatham House Rule. Under that rule, I’m free to report what I said and people’s reactions as long as I don’t name them. In the Q&A, I said that one deregulatory move I thought President Trump should propose is to get rid of the federal restrictions on...

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Some Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy hopes that Congress and the Trump administration make these three resolutions for 2020. A slice: Last year’s trade policy was chaotic. This was largely a result of the president’s random announcements, often on Twitter, that he’d apply tariffs on goods coming into the country. In some cases, the tariffs were meant to negotiate radically different trade deals than the ones we already had, a goal never achieved so far. In other cases,...

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