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Tag Archives: Trade

Commerce Is Still Doux

In my most-recent column for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, I offer what I believe to be legitimate reasons to question the claim that the U.S. government leaving Americans free to trade with the Chinese people supports the beasts in Beijing and their tyranny. A slice: Precisely because free trade and free markets enrich ordinary people in China, these people gain greater stakes in keeping China’s trade and markets free. The Chinese people come to rely more on the commercial ties that...

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Lies, Damn Lies, and…

Here’s a letter to a sympathetic patron of Cafe Hayek: Mr. Fulton: Thanks for your e-mail. I did indeed read in today’s Wall Street Journal about the decline in U.S. manufacturing output, and I agree that this decline likely has much to do with Trump’s war on Americans who trade with foreigners. But I’ll refrain from blogging on it. There’s a larger monster that lurks, one that I don’t wish to feed. Indeed, I want to do my part to slay this beast. This larger monster is the too-frequent...

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Some Links

Richard Ebeling identifies the poisonous root of the NBA’s recent kowtowing to the authoritarians in Beijing. In this slice, Richard makes the solid point that two wrongs don’t make a right: In the hysteria of an American political election season, the worst thing that could happen would be if politicians and pundits now propose to legislate or regulate the response by the NBA or the Houston Rockets to the Chinese government. With all the chatter about the Chinese attempting to abridge...

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Some Links

My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy isn’t favorably impressed by Trump’s new kinda-sorta-maybe trade deal with China. Megan McArdle isn’t favorably impressed with Elizabeth Warren’s knowledge of health-care economics. Vincent Geloso isn’t super-impressed with the economics that was most-recently awarded a Nobel Prize. A slice: First, the narrowing of the focus provides results that are not that surprising: more capital makes small firms more productive; better food...

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Pittsburgh Tribune-Review: “Fear China?”

My July 7th, 2005, column for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review was inspired not only by the attempt by the China National Offshore Oil Corp. (CNOOC) to buy a majority stake in Unocal, a U.S.-headquartered oil company, but by some poorly reasoned opposition to this sale. (See, for example, this bizarrely bad column by Paul Krugman.) My arguments for why Americans had nothing to fear from this purchase are in the column beneath the fold. Fear China? Should Americans worry if China National...

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Free Trade, Properly Defined and Understood

In my latest column for AIER I do my best to explain that a policy of free trade for country X does not depend upon what policies are, or are not, pursued by the governments of countries Y and Z. A slice: Protectionists define free trade differently than do economists. Economists (and all knowledgeable free traders) define free trade exclusively as a domestic condition – that is, as a policy to be adopted or not by the home government. If adopted, the home government remains blind to the...

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Some Links

Don’t let David Breitenbeck’s misspelling of “imminent” fool you: this short essay explaining his skepticism of climate-change alarmism is very Bryan Caplan-esque and superb. Here’s his wise conclusion: While I may not be able to say what the climate is doing, I can say what climate activists are doing, and from that, I can judge that they should be kept as far away from positions of power as humanly possible. We haven’t seen what happens when the ice caps melt, but we have seen what...

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Interpreting Trade

My good and intelligent friend Reuvain B. e-mailed me to suggest that in this letter I was unfair to whoever at the Federalist Society wrote the two-paragraph description of the up-coming Federalist Society event titled, tellingly, “Fair Trade: Reinvigorating American Leadership in the 21st Century.” Here’s my reply to Reuvain: Reuvain, The second paragraph of that two-paragraph Federalist Society description reads to me, rather clearly, as one that gives much too much credence to...

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Some Links

Alex Nowrasteh highly recommends Azar Gat’s book Nations: The Long History and Deep Roots of Political Ethnicity and Nationalism. A slice from Alex’s post: Fortunately, recent scholars have put forward new definitions of nationalism. Yoram Hazony tries to define nationalism in his book The Virtue of Nationalism, but he produces a confused mishmash that boils down to (1) nationalism is a natural and ancient human ideology and (2) real nationalists are not responsible for anything bad like...

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Trade Hooey

Not knowing who at the Federalist Society – an organization that I greatly admire and respect – wrote that which I criticize in my letter, I address my letter generally. Federalist Society: Yesterday an e-mail from you announced an event titled “Fair Trade: Reinvigorating American Leadership in the 21st Century,” the opening address for which will be delivered by Commerce secretary Wilbur Ross. While everything that Sec. Ross says about international trade is sheer nonsense, it’s not...

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