Wednesday , February 20 2019
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Tag Archives: Uncategorized

McCloskey on Liberalism

Concretely I mean that the bizarre 18th-century idea of liberalism—which is the theory of a society composed entirely of free people, liberi, and no slaves—gave ordinary people the notion that they could have a go.  And go they did. In the earliest if hesitatingly liberal societies such as Britain and France, and among the liberi in societies still fully dominated by traditional hierarchies such as Russia and much of Italy, or the slave states of the United States,...

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The Route that Leads to Tokyo

During a luncheon with Toronto Mayoral candidate John Tory (since re-elected) a few months ago, the case of Tokyo’s successful public transit was held up as a standard of success. With the Japanese Consul General in attendance at lunch, it was evidently a chance to extend a polite compliment too. If Japan’s private sector was in the room, it would have been apt to commend them too – most of Japan’s world class rail and public transit system privately owned. Extensive...

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In Memoriam: Anthony de Jasay

On 23 January, 2019, the great Libertarian political theorist Anthony de Jasay died, aged 93. The conventional euphemisms like ‘passing away’ are misleading. They distract from the sad reality of death but also from what is lasting beyond it. As a person and as a thinker Anthony de Jasay has left a lasting impression with those who had the good fortune to meet him either in person and/or in his writings. Since I have been very fortunate in both regards, I will try to...

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THE WOLF STREET REPORT

Is this the Beginning of a Globalized Housing Downturn? Housing has became a global financialized asset class. The possibilities seemed unlimited. And this flow of money, along with local factors, has created enormous distortions in some markets. But the priciest markets are now starting to experience price declines. This includes the priciest markets in the US, Canada, Australia, the UK, Hong Kong, and others. So, is this the beginning of a globalized housing downturn? (13 minutes):...

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Good Fences Make Good Neighbors

Robert Frost was right: good fences make good neighbors. So do good peach trees, especially when combined with an invitation to the neighbors to come and pick peaches to their hearts’ content because said tree’s branches are positively sagging with fruit. The invitation couldn’t have come a moment too soon as we had just run out of peaches at breakfast. A couple of the kids and I tromped down the street to the neighbors’ house with a basket, a bag, and visions of a...

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The In-Kind Party

I got the below from a friend, someone I respect very much. The ideas (as the author him/herself would note) are not developed fully, or even halfway. This is a kind of stream-of-consciousness reaction to the difficulties that many young (35 and under) people see with our existing two-party system, and its corrosive tribalism. Feel free to respond in comments, and I’ll make sure the author sees the responses. ************************************************************...

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Pave the Muddy Paths….

There are many definitions of “rule of law.” My good friend Paul Burgess is actually writing a dissertation on just how hard, but interesting, it is to try to define the concept. But, one person who had a clear definition was F.A. Hayek. I paraphrase that claim here: pave the muddy paths. Ohio State UniversityPublished on: January 24, 2019January 24, 2019Author: Mike Munger

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The Stupid House = Nation Analogy Is Back

The argument seems to be this: “Your house has walls, doesn’t it? Well, then, you must on pain of consistency hold that it’s right to put a wall around the country. If you really believed in open borders, you’d have an open door policy and let anyone come into your house whenever they want.”Even self-described libertarian websites make arguments like this.Once again, a nation is not like a house.Let’s imagine it were. The analogy would prove too much. In my house, I’m free to...

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