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Tag Archives: Video

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My GMU Econ colleague Bryan Caplan, writing in Time, reflects wisely on the recent college-admissions scandal. Here’s his conclusion: As a college professor, I’ve spent years blowing the whistle on the wasteful system that employs me. When the FBI went public with this case, many of my Twitter friends declared victory on my behalf. Yet truth be told, this salacious scandal proves next to nothing. It just illustrates the obvious. Though we casually talk about our “institutions of higher...

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Here’s an ungated version of David Henderson’s excellent tribute, from the Wall Street Journal, to the late, great Harold Demsetz. A slice: He was also an early defender of gay rights. At the September 1978 Mont Pelerin Society meeting in Hong Kong, he decried a California ballot initiative that would have banned homosexuals from teaching in public schools, ignoring snickers from some in the crowd. The initiative went down to a well-deserved defeat, helped by the opposition of Demsetz’s...

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My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy and co-author Jack Salmon rightly decry Uncle Sam’s fiscal imprudence. Jeffrey Tucker exposes the evil ideology of the monster who unleashed mass murder in New Zealand. My GMU Econ colleague Alex Tabarrok has some data on how much time criminal convicts really spend in prison. Wall Street Journal columnist Dan Henninger wisely advises us to laugh at – and to fear – the socialism that is now all the rage among so many Americans. A...

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Russ Roberts writes wisely and well about economics, scientism, and Adam Smith. Megan McArdle wisely warns against unleashing the mad dogs of antitrust. Speaking of antitrust, this short new video from the Competitive Enterprise Institute is a must-see. Also warning against the mad dogs of antitrust is James Pethokoukis. Here’s his conclusion: What explains the misguided nature of Warren’s proposal? First, she concedes she doesn’t care about economic arguments, such as how network...

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Kevin Williamson gives two cheers to income differences. A slice: The American political scene does not look the way it does because American politics is dominated by billionaires. If the American political system were dominated by billionaires, Donald J. Trump would not have been the Republican nominee in 2016 and probably would not be president. If the Koch brothers had their way, gay marriage would have been legal a long time before it was, corporate welfare would be a thing of the...

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In today’s Wall Street Journal, David Henderson remembers Harold Demsetz, who died last week at the age of 88. A slice (link added): Perhaps Demsetz’s most enduring contribution to social science came in 1969, when he coined what is now known as the “nirvana fallacy” in a critique of fellow economist Kenneth J. Arrow’s assumption that government could make markets more efficient. Demsetz conceded that perfect government intervention might improve things, but noted that Arrow, like many...

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My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy appeared with Charles Payne to discuss U.S.-China trade. David Von Drehle – inspired by Gale Pooley’s and Marian Tupy’s new Simon Abundance Index – wisely warns against the super-abundant gloom’n’doom Malthusian predictions. A slice: Measured by global average hourly income, the price of a representative basket of 50 key commodities — food, energy, minerals and so forth — fell by nearly two-thirds between when the bet was made and...

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David French exposes the many fallacies – and the thorough shallowness – of Tucker Carlson’s populism. (HT Scott Lincicome) A slice: The problem with populism — and indeed with much of American politics — is that it focuses on the political at the expense of the personal. As I’ve argued many times, there are wounds that public policy can’t heal. But populism too often pretends otherwise. It tells a fundamentally false story about Americans as victims of a heartless elite and their...

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My intrepid Mercatus Center colleague Veronique de Rugy interviews Steve Moore on Moore’s and Arthur Laffer’s new book, Trumponomics. Kevin Williamson sings the praises of the division of labor – and of the institutions that make it deep and productive. (Also at work in prosperous, modern societies is innovation unleashed through the widespread acceptance of bourgeois norms.) (HT Richard Fulmer) A slice: In the 1990s, we came to believe, if only for a couple of years, that “the laws of...

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