Sunday , November 29 2020
Home / Video / Judge Andrew P. Napolitano: Court packing — A brief but important history

Judge Andrew P. Napolitano: Court packing — A brief but important history

Summary:
Read full article here: https://readnews.io/t0osmv Since the death of liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the determination of President Donald Trump to fill her Supreme Court seat before Election Day with the traditionalist Judge Amy Coney Barrett, the concept of court packing has reared its head. The phrase court packing is a derogatory reference to legislation that alters the number of seats on the Supreme Court to alter its perceived ideological makeup. The origins of modern court packing are from the depression era when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt sought to expand the courtfrom nine to 15 by adding a new justice for every sitting justice who declined to retire upon reaching his 70th birthday. FDR offered the plan in the spring of 1937, shortly after he was inaugurated

Topics:
Andrew P. Napolitano considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Tyler Durden writes Are Students Liberal? Yes – But Not Everywhere

Tyler Durden writes Shots Fired: China Slaps “Distressing” Tariffs Up To 212% On Australian Wine

Tyler Durden writes Suicides In Japan Jumped 39% In October…

Tyler Durden writes Airport Deploys ‘Virus-Killing Robots’ During Holidays As Mall Santas Turn To Plexiglass Barriers And ‘Sanitation Elves’

Read full article here: https://readnews.io/t0osmv Since the death of liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the determination of President Donald Trump to fill her Supreme Court seat before Election Day with the traditionalist Judge Amy Coney Barrett, the concept of court packing has reared its head. The phrase court packing is a derogatory reference to legislation that alters the number of seats on the Supreme Court to alter its perceived ideological makeup. The origins of modern court packing are from the depression era when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt sought to expand the courtfrom nine to 15 by adding a new justice for every sitting justice who declined to retire upon reaching his 70th birthday. FDR offered the plan in the spring of 1937, shortly after he was inaugurated to his second term. He had just been reelected in a landslide and was frustrated that much of his legislation had been invalidated by the Supreme Court as beyond the powers of the federal government. SEN. TOM COTTON: CONFIRM AMY CONEY BARRETT TO THE SUPREME COURT. THE SECOND AMENDMENT IS AT STAKEFDRs stated reasoning was that the court had a congestion of cases since its nine justices were, he claimed, slow to address the appeals that came before them, and a larger number of justices would make for a more efficient court. Few believed this subterfuge. If nine were too slow, then 15 would be slower. FDR really wanted more pro-New Deal justices who would ratify his radical proposals to centralize, plan and control the economy. Nevertheless, his court packing was immensely unpopular and the plan never made it out of the Senate Judiciary Committee. But historians have debated whether the proposal actually worked, and here is why. Before FDRs plan died, one of the conservative justices, Owen Roberts, had a change of heart on the constitutional scope of the federal government, and he began voting with the courts liberal wing to uphold New Deal legislation against constitutional challenges. Though the Judge Andrew P. Napolitano: Court packing -- A brief but important history
Andrew P. Napolitano
Andrew Peter Napolitano (born June 6, 1950) is the Senior Judicial Analyst for Fox News Channel, commenting on legal news and trials, and is a syndicated columnist whose work appears in numerous publications, such as Fox News, The Washington Times, and Reason. Having served as a New Jersey Superior Court Judge, he now teaches constitutional law as a Distinguished Professor at Brooklyn Law School. Napolitano has written nine books on constitutional, legal, and political subjects.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *